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Looking for a different angle on English language podcasts? Keiran the crazy Canadian goes where the other English podcasts don't... and more. Keiran and his native English guests discuss politically incorrect subjects as well as general English language, idioms, expressions, culture and more all while having natural unscripted conversations. This podcasts feature an educational exploration of language ranging from every day expressions, pop culture expressions, explicit language and anything in between. The podcast is geared towards adults students, professionals, university students as well as ESL teachers who want to step out of the "Safe Space" of the English language education community and have a little more fun. Join Keiran and his guests in their down to earth humorous conversations and learn to speak a more universal edgy form of English like a native! English ISN'T always PC!!!
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Now displaying: Page 4
Dec 6, 2016

Are you looking for a way to challenge your English? Want to speak to native English speakers in a group? Why the hell haven't you done our Story Telling Challenge. Today we have the second winner from the Story Telling Challenge #2 on the podcast. We talk about technology, knees, and the possible cyborg future. Don't be a chicken to the next challenge!

 

*** Transcript*** 

 

 

Keiran:

All right. What's up, everybody. Today, on the podcast, we have two guests with us. We have Max [Lemire 00:00:09], the American, the Trump supporter, back on the podcast. How's it going, Max?

 

Max:

Hey, Keiran. I'm not a Trump supporter, but thanks for that. Doing well, thanks. How are you?

 

Keiran:

I'm good, I'm good. Thank you. Then we also have Pavel who was one of the participants in our Storytelling challenge. How are you doing, Pavel?

 

Pavel:

Hello. I'm fine.

 

Keiran:

Good. All right. Great. Max, why don't you and Pavel get to know each other for one minute while I pull up the article?

 

Max:

Sure, sure. Pavel, what are you doing for work?

 

Pavel:

I'm working as a software developer.

 

Max:

Nice. Are you working on cell phone applications?

 

Pavel:

Cell phone applications, too, as well.

 

Max:

All right. What's the main application?

 

Pavel:

Last year, I'm working on entertainment publications for iPhones.

 

Max:

Nice. That sounds fun. I don't code very well, but I tried to do a bit in university. After the hard physics related stuff, I just stopped doing any of it.

 

Keiran:

All right. You're not a big fan of physics then, Max.

 

Max:

It's hard to program it. I like physics, but it's hard to program.

 

Keiran:

That's great because we got a perfect topic for you then today. We're going to talk a little bit about some sciences, and I don't know if it's physics related stuff, but I'm going to read the title of this article so the listeners can know a little bit about what we're talking about. I'm going to post the article in the transcript so you guys can read it if you want. Then Max and Pavel and I are going to just have a conversation about it. The title of this and the caption below it, The Innovators, The Silk Road to Reducing Knee Operations. New bio material called FibroFix re-spins a silk protein like a spider into tough cartilage type material for knee implants, cutting the rising number of expensive knee replacement ops.

 

 

Basically, they created a material that's similar to a spider web or I guess silkworms web or webbing or whatever, and they're going to use this to reduce the cost of knee operations. I'm going to read a little bit more here. Silkworms and spiderwebs may hold the solution to one of the Western world's most pressing health problems, the surge in the need for knee replacements as the population grows older and more obese.

 

 

Max, what do you think about this, using technology that we're mimicking silkworms or spider worms to replace faulty knees?

 

Max:

I think that's fantastic. Typically, what we're making replacement parts for people out of are either other animals. We use pig heart valves for heart valve replacements in people, we use pig's valves. Otherwise, we're using mechanical ones made out of metal and other different I guess materials. If we're able to use something that's organic, more organic, I think it's better because our body won't reject it.

 

Keiran:

All right. What do you think about that, Pavel? Do you think this article and what they're proposing is a good idea?

 

Pavel:

Yes, I think it's a very good idea to use spider proteins for a human tissues. Also, I'm very glad that the science in general still developing. Still there are many things that need to be developed, and scientists still working on it.

 

Keiran:

This is pretty amazing technology, I think, but the one thing I think is that, to me, it seems like one step closer to ... We're using organic materials to heal ourselves or to treat ourselves so that we can last longer.

 

Max:

Exactly.

 

Keiran:

This is the principle behind this article. Max?

 

Max:

I totally agree with that. I think the big deal of the article is right now the implants they're using are real expensive, and these are going to be a lot cheaper so people are going to be able to afford the operation.

 

Keiran:

If you think about this a little more, it seems like we're just one step away or a few steps away from organically combining robotics and humans. If they're doing this to replace a knee, weak knees or bad knees, I imagine in the future, we're going to be seeing some kind of cyborg. This is a good idea. Pavel, you agree with that. Max, you agree with that, but what if we go towards replacing bad knees with robotics that make us stronger, superior? Do you think this is maybe dangerous for us?

 

Max:

I've always dreamed of becoming half robot, half man, so I think that would be ... Even if there's risks involved, I think it's worth it. What do you think, Pavel?

 

Pavel:

I don't think there is something dangerous to be more robotics for people. Maybe people will be better. I think most of people will be better.

 

Keiran:

You guys are both in favor of combining robotics, basically upgrading human beings with robotic limbs.

 

Max:

Yeah. How do you feel about that, Keiran?

 

Keiran:

I think for someone like me or you or Pavel, I think it's fine. If we had a bad knee and we want to just go for a walk or a run, that's fine, but if we use robotic in replacements in military soldiers, that might be problematic, no?

 

Max:

It would be scary. It's just like any technology. It's going to be whoever has the newest technology has the strongest army. That's been a classic. Whoever had tanks first was dominant in World War I. Then whoever had the better tanks in World War II. I think it's more World War II, but technology will always be like that no matter what happens. I'm looking forward to becoming half man, half silkworm. Like this article says, I can become part silkworm.

 

Keiran:

Ok that's weird.

 

Max:

Joke.

 

Keiran:

Pavel, would you be worried about anything if we were, we were approving cyborg limbs? Would any of this worry you?

 

Pavel:

Excuse me. I did not hear the last part of phrase.

 

Keiran:

No problem. If we legalize cyborg limbs, like robotic knees and robotic arms, for people who have arm problems, do you think this would maybe be dangerous in any way?

 

Pavel:

No. I think it can be dangerous because people can use a robotic arms or guns or rifles. What's the difference? If people want to be evil or dangerous, they can find a way anywhere.

 

Keiran:

That's an interesting point.

 

Max:

That's a good point. You're saying, Pavel, the tool doesn't matter. If the person's going to break the law, they can do it already.

 

Pavel:

Exactly. If people want to do something good, they can get better abilities for it. I think it's good for every side.

 

Keiran:

All right. I guess that makes sense. You're saying if people are going to do bad things, they're just going to do them. It doesn't matter if they have robotic legs or guns. The robotics upgrades are not going make them do it more. They're already going to do those bad actions. That's basically what you're saying. I just think we had this shooting a few years ago in Montreal, Pavel, where this guy went to a college with a machine gun and he killed many people in that college. Do you remember that, Max, the Dawson shooting?

 

Max:

Yeah. I was there a few weeks before it happened. It was scary.

 

Keiran:

If they never had machine guns, he probably would have still did something. Maybe he would have went in with a sword, but he would have done less, right?

 

Max:

Right, right. I see what you mean.

 

Keiran:

Maybe. Maybe. Who knows? Maybe with a sword, he would have to be a more fit person to actually do it. I don't know.

 

Max:

Maybe if he had to dedicate a few years to learning the sword, he would have found peace instead of going on a crime with someone that's easy to use. I'm not even joking. It takes a lot of training to use those things.

 

Keiran:

To use a sword?

 

Max:

Yeah. To use it well and to be able to defend yourself.

 

Keiran:

All right. Any last thoughts about this, Pavel, before we finish it up?

 

Pavel:

Actually, no.

 

Keiran:

What about you, Max?

 

Max:

I still want to be half man, half silkworm.

 

Keiran:

Pavel and Max are still on the cyborg boat, and I'm against the cyborgs. All right. Pavel, thanks for coming on so much and for doing this. I know this is challenging, but it's a great challenge for you, and I think you did really well.

 

Max:

Thanks for coming, Pavel.

 

Pavel:

Thank you. It was nice to meet you.

 

Max:

It was nice to meet you, too.

 

Keiran:

All right. Max, we don't really appreciate you because you're a dirty American, but I guess we should thank you a little bit.

 

Max:

I guess I'm just patient then.

 

Keiran:

Thanks also, Max, for coming on. Guys, if you're listening to this and you want to do the next Storytelling challenge, then listen up for it because you can come on like Pavel and can have a conversation with another native speaker and really challenge your own English. You can like it, subscribe to us, and check it out on the Facebook page, too. We'll put more updates up there soon. Thanks, guys, and we'll catch you on the next episode of Censored English.

 

 

Dec 3, 2016

How to express that you are overwhelmed with work, garbage, or you have to many things to do. Today on the podcast we briefly talk about being swamped. Then we fill you sexy listeners out there in on a special challenge we have coming up next week. Lastly Sabrina joins me on the podcast to discuss a hot topic right now, flag burning in America. 

 

***No Transcript*** Video Version available on Youtube

 

 

Nov 30, 2016

Have you felt confused about what to say in the beginning of a conversation? Have you ever felt lost in a conversation? Today on Uncensored English two native English speakers talk to each other for the very first time! Anna the Australian English teacher joins me and we speak to each other for the very first time live on the podcast.

 

*** Transcript *** 

 

Keiran:

Hey Anna! How's a going?

 

Anna:

Hello, Hello Keiran! Nice to meet you finally.

 

Keiran:

Yeah it's good to meet you. So what's the weather over there like?

 

Anna:

(laughter) Well, it's probably not much for you, but for me it's very cold. It's just gotten down to zero and it's starting to go under.

 

Keiran:

Okay, and where exactly are you?

 

Anna:

Oh, I'm in Germany, sorry. Um but so I am originally from Australia, as you can probably hear from my accent. Yes I am living in Germany, living and working in Germany for a bit over a year now.

 

Keiran:

Okay, great, and what have you been doing?

 

Anna:

Mostly teaching, actually. I kind of have two lives, so I work as a teacher and a translator on one side, but on the other side I work as a musician, as an opera singer.

 

Keiran:

Oh great, that's awesome.

 

Anna:

Yeah. What about you? Like where are you located?

 

Keiran:

I'm in Montreal, Montreal Canada.

 

Anna:

Oh, wonderful.

 

Keiran:

And I used to have two lives, I used to be as cool as you, I don't anymore. Um I used to be teaching ... well I would say teaching full time ... and then doing stand-up comedy.

 

Anna:

Noooo

 

Keiran:

Yeah, but actually I was teaching and I was doing stand-up comedy, and then I was podcasting and, unfortunately how it is in Montreal, is that it's not very good to make a living doing comedy.

 

Anna:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

So the teaching was going great. The podcasting, I didn't put too much energy into it up until recently, but it was stably growing.

 

Anna:

Cool.

 

Keiran:

So I decided to put the comedy on pause for a little bit, and now, I've dropped by double life I guess.

 

Anna:

(laughter) That's amazing. How does it work being a stand-up comedian? What's the business like? I don't really know anything about it.

 

Keiran:

It's degrading.

 

Anna:

Oh (laughter) So it's not that different from being an opera singer then I'm sure.

 

Keiran:

Right, there's a lot of performing for free in the beginning ...

 

Anna:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I was doing it for about 2 years. And I can't say like seriously, like if I was doing it seriously for 2 years I would be trying to go up and perform every night. And I didn't do it that much. I feel until you've reached a certain level, or you've made the right connection, you're going to perform for free.

 

Anna:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

And that sometimes involves driving 6 hours to perform for 6 minutes and getting no money.

 

Anna:

Yeah. Do you have auditions as well? Because one of the things we have to do is you know, drive across the country, or to catch a train across the country to just do these auditions for like, you know, 2 minutes, sing, leave, and then find out in a few weeks.

 

Keiran:

 

Uh Not really, like we don't do auditions so much as we do open mics.

 

Anna:

Right.

 

Keiran:

Open Mic is basically you and a bunch of amateurs, or they also have pro comics who are working on new material. So obviously they don't want to do new material in front of like an audience that's paid like a good amount of money right? Because that might back-fire.

 

Anna:

Yeah, exactly.

 

Keiran:

That's our audition.

 

Anna:

Okay well there you go. And so how long ago was it that you kind of put that on hold?

 

Keiran:

I put it on hold in the beginning of November. Yeah, it's going to be like that until maybe April, May, May, June, put it on hold.

 

Anna:

Oh okay. All right. That's not that big of a break, that's all right.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it's not big of a break but I think it's one of those things where you need to put in the time to get better, and I don't know, you're never getting younger so I don't think you should delay your passions for too long you know?

 

Anna:

(laughter) That's a really good point. And that's actually, I actually used to work in the corporate world. I used to work in project management and marketing, and this kind of stuff. And actually, what you just said is exactly why I changed paths completely and ended up studying music, halfway through my twenties.

 

Keiran:

That's great. That's awesome.

 

Anna:

So, yeah.

 

Keiran:

It takes a lot of courage to do that because these are jobs that are paying you money right?

 

Anna:

Yes (laughter)

 

Keiran:

[crosstalk 00:04:07] these are gambles, like these are ... so that's awesome.

 

Anna:

I like to say that every year I've gotten poorer, but happier.

 

Keiran:

(laughter) Ah that's funny.

 

Anna:

(laughter) So there you go, I don't know if I'm getting happier because of my age or because of those decisions but ...

 

Keiran:

Right. Well, I mean you're pursuing your passion. That takes courage, I think that's great.

 

Anna:

Yeah

 

Keiran:

So, how did you start teaching? How did you get into teaching?

 

Anna:

Yeah, actually it, I mean technically I've always been a helper ... I guess you would say ... or a leader maybe is a better word for it. I've always been the kind of person who likes taking charge and you know, I learn very quickly. So even at school, really, I was always that brat who put her hand up right at the beginning of class and already knew all of the answers, and so I kind of always kind of helped other students in that way.

 

 

But I didn't really start teaching until I was at University and then I would start kind of helping people with writing essays, especially foreign language students maybe, who needed that extra help editing things. I'd also tutored in Spanish, because I was learning Spanish at University. And um when I finished my degree, I got my certification, my TESOL certification. And then I kind of always done it kind of casually, but then since moving to Germany, it then kind of became a bit more of a full-time thing in order to kind of tie me over between my old life and my new life I guess you would say.

 

Keiran:

Okay, and so you're teaching in Germany in what way?

 

Anna:

Uh just, with this kind of stuff, with I talking on Skype, just online.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so you're not teaching in schools.

 

Anna:

No, so there's very ... it kind of, oh sorry you don't mean a public school you mean like a private school?

 

Keiran:

Well, any kind of school, like are you, you're purely teaching online at the moment?

 

Anna:

At the moment, yeah. So I have done in person classes, mainly through corporate agencies. So still one on one, but you know, actually going out to the businesses and sitting down with executives and talking things through. Um of course because of my performance background, I also love helping people on things like giving presentations, and how to use their voice ... and I think you also do some work with accents, which makes sense now that I know about your kind of, other life. (laughter) ... But yeah, you know, it's kind of that kind of thing helping people be confident and ...

 

Keiran:

Yeah

 

Anna:

... feel a bit more maybe, relaxed while also improving.

 

Keiran:

Right. Yeah, and you're voice is such an important tool.

 

Anna:

Mm-hmm

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I think you're right. You know I never thought that stand-up ... comedy, whatever I kind of came into teaching ... because usually it's, you're very onto like the politically incorrect end of the spectrum right? But it is, it's a lot of, part of fitting in I think is just learning to accept that you're not perfect and you grow more confident as you keep trying and you keep doing things.

 

Anna:

True, but also probably the stand-up, I'm guessing you do stuff with word play at some, like a few points?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you're right

 

Anna:

I think, I think you know in my experience all the good language teachers, be they you know in English or Spanish or German, you know, the ones who really have that passion, and who really can have fun with a language? Who, you know, it's not just about rules, rules, rules, but actually about like how can we make this something more exciting?

 

Keiran:

Right, yeah and that's one thing I was curious about whether you taught in schools because I've taught ... I've been teaching since I was 16, I started as a swim instructor for about 8 years.

 

Anna:

Oh! I used to be a personal trainer! There you go.

 

Keiran:

There you go! Yeah. We just have this track record of being in the position of, you know ... these are, you have to get concrete results for the people who are coming to your classes right? Like this is, if you don't they just choose someone else ... and that's why I was curious because I didn't like schools. I didn't like language schools, I thought they were ineffective. And in a language school, the students kind of get the short end of the stick. They get tested, they get put in a class, and that's their teacher, that's their curriculum, they don't have a choice.

 

Anna:

And that's the pace at which they learn.

 

Keiran:

Exactly. And they're stuck at that like, speed. And if you are the most advanced student in that class, that sucks. And if you're the lowest student in the class that sucks right?

 

 

Online it's amazing, like first of all, if you don't like your teacher then, just "Bye, bye, I'll find someone else."

 

Anna:

Yeah "It was nice meeting you, see you later."

 

Keiran:

Yeah and the curriculum is, it's always malleable, you can always change it the way you want right?

 

Anna:

Yeah exactly. I mean I'm, as you can imagine, I'm also learning German at the moment to keep expanding my skills here, and I pick up grammar rules very quickly, I mean I think a lot of English teachers, when you go to, like familiarity with how other people learn languages, sometimes you get to know what works for you as well, very quickly. And for me I found that in group classes that I've tried, yeah it's so frustrating because, sometimes they'll be explaining something they explained yesterday, and I'm like "But I understood it when you explained it yesterday" ...

 

Keiran:

Right, right. And then, yeah and then ...

 

Anna:

And then on the flip-side you can see other people struggling and you're like, I don't know, like there's no solution in a group class, in that situation.

 

Keiran:

No its, and in a group class usually the teacher is teaching, like this is how the teacher will teach the subject, either you get it or you don't. Like they haven't prepared, most teachers don't prepare 5 ways to teach ... because there's different types of learners right? And that doesn't ...

 

Anna:

Of course.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, so that's another good point.

 

 

So Anna, what's your ... I'm curious more about you as a person ... what's your family life like? Like do you come from a big family, a small family?

 

Anna:

Yeah. I come from a bit of a, it's strange, I guess a modern family you would say. (laughter) So quite small, in some respects. I have a lot of cousins, because my mother was one of five children, so there's quite a lot of cousins and aunts and uncles. But in terms of my immediate family, I have two half brothers.

 

Keiran:

OK

 

Anna:

So my mother married quite young, she had my two brothers in her first marriage. Then they got divorced, and much, much later she met my father and had me.

 

Keiran:

That's interesting. So what's your relationship like with your half brothers?

 

Anna:

I kind of think of it more like uncles, because they were 16, sorry they were 15 and 16 when I was born. So they're quite a bit older, so I think they've always been kind of an older presence, maybe not so much like brothers in a traditional sense. We didn't really grow up together for example. But we get along great ... is the short answer ... my whole family is terrific, I'm very lucky in that respect.

 

Keiran:

Right. I'd imagine there would be more tension like if you were born very close to them, because I ... like I just know in my family, I have three sisters ...

 

Anna:

Oh, wow.

 

Keiran:

... three sisters, who are your sisters, like you're immediate sisters, like you're always going to have friction.

 

Anna:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)

 

Keiran:

But I imagine if my father and my mother married someone else and then had more kids, then I imagine the friction with like a step brother ...

 

Anna:

Would be more

 

Keiran:

... who was the same age would be way worse.

 

Anna:

Yeah

 

Keiran:

You know like, that's, you're your mother's kids, but that kid is your step father's kid ...

 

Anna:

Yeah

 

Keiran:

... I imagine that would just ... maybe I'm wrong but ...

 

Anna:

Yeah, I mean I was quite lucky in that like, my first few years like as a toddler, my brothers were kind of in their late teens. And so to them, I was just a bunch of fun. Like they just loved like playing games with me and like playing, like throwing balls, and kind of I guess babysitting for my mom a bit, and so it was really, I think it worked out really well. And then, if course like my brother, my younger older brother (laughter) was the first to give me a beer, for example, when I was 13. (laughter) He gave me my first beer, he was in his late twenties and, you know, so it's kind of been quite a fun relationship really. And they're all musicians as well, actually.

 

Keiran:

That's cool so that's where you get your, I guess you're artistic side

 

Anna:

Yeah, that's interesting. Yeah, and what about, so you said you had three sisters, are they all older or?

 

Keiran:

No. I have one older sister, and then I have two younger sisters. And yeah, I mean like I said, he had a lot of friction growing up. We ...

 

Anna:

Oh, Okay. Are you all very close in age or?

 

Keiran:

My oldest sister is I think 2 or 3 years older than me. Yeah I never know my sister's ages. (laughter)

 

Anna:

(laughter)

 

Keiran:

My younger sisters are ...

 

Anna:

There's so much friction, you never remembered they're birthdays

 

Keiran:

Yeah maybe because I haven't remembering their birthdays and buying them presents or something. My younger sisters are, I don't know, 2 and 5 years younger than me I think? Yeah, we're spread out, but I mean it's a lot of bodies in the house and we grew up in a one TV household, so I think that itself creates a lot of problems back in the day.

 

Anna:

Oh that wasn't so uncommon though, back when you were growing up I imagine.

 

Keiran:

No, but, I mean today it doesn't matter because first of all, we don't really use TV anymore, and then second of all everyone has their own thing. But ...

 

Anna:

Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah true.

 

Keiran:

I mean I didn't want to watch whatever show they were watching you know. It's kind of like a 3 against 1 thing, like "Oh, let's watch the show that appealing to them or me." You know, I would always lose out because it just, the majority wins on those right?

 

Anna:

Yeah. Well I suppose like you know, on the plus side, I mean it's a kind of a hashtag first world problem (laughter)

 

Keiran:

Yeah, yeah what a terrible life I had right?

 

Anna:

Especially when I think about the stories my mom told me about her growing up because she was, as I said, 1 of 5, but she had 4 brothers. So she was the only girl with 4 brothers. And of course, back when she was growing up, that meant she had to do all of the work.

 

Keiran:

Yeah

 

Anna:

You know, she had to help with all of the washing and the cleaning and the cooking, and that was her responsibility and the boys could just go play.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I think I kind of got that, I mean it's, I kind of got that side of the deal in the sense that ... like my father I think is a very modern man. He washes the dishes, he cooks too, he at least ...

 

Anna:

Yeah so does mine.

 

Keiran:

But, when there's a family event, my family's a little odd in that, basically my father and I are the only males in our family so my mother has 3 sisters, and one of her sisters has 4 daughters ...

 

Anna:

Oh my gosh, Okay.

 

Keiran:

... her husband is divorced and dead. So we have a family thing it's like me and my father and then a whole bunch of women.

 

Anna:

Yeah, not a lot of Y chromosomes floating around I guess.

 

Keiran:

No but then that makes me a very special like, everyone's always like "Oh Keiran! The boy of the family!" And my sisters are like, "It's not fair, he gets treated special" you know?

 

Anna:

Well I mean, the good thing is that my mom, being the only girl, she was the only one who got her own room.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Anna:

So that was the benefit.

 

Keiran:

Yeah

 

Anna:

That was the only benefit, according to her, was that she got her own room.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, she gets a little privacy right.

 

Anna:

Yeah, exactly.

 

Keiran:

All right well Anna, it was great talking to you, but we gotta wrap this one up.

 

Anna:

Sure.

 

Keiran:

Thanks so much for coming on the podcast, this was a great conversation I would like to have you on again.

 

Anna:

Yeah, awesome I would love that.

 

Keiran:

All right

 

Anna:

Lovely to meet you.

 

Keiran:

Yeah it was great meeting you too, Bye bye!

 

Anna:

Bye!

 

Nov 28, 2016

Want to improve your English speaking abilities? Want to get some high pressure, intense yet fun practice. We hold the story telling challenge periodically to reward our listeners for working on their English. Today one of the winners, Mais, joins myself and Edward for a discussion about a topic that has been shrouded in controversy over the last few years. 

 

*** Transcript*** 

 

Keiran:

All right, what's up everyone? Today is the podcast for Monday, November 28th and we have one of the winners from the story telling challenge number two, Mais, on the podcast. How's it going, Mais?

 

Mais:

Good. How are you?

 

Keiran:

I'm good, I'm good. We also got Edward on the podcast. How's it going, Edward?

 

Edward:

I'm going well, I'm doing well.

 

Keiran:

You're doing well.

 

Edward:

It's going well, it's going well. Thank you.

 

Keiran:

All right, you guys want to get to know each other briefly for a minute?

 

Edward:

Sure. So this is the first time that we are meeting. Mais, so nice to meet you.

 

Mais:

Tru, nice to meet you too.

 

Edward:

Where are you, where are we speaking to you? No wait. Where are you, as we are speaking to you?

 

Mais:

Okay, right now I'm in Tampa, Florida, the US.

 

Edward:

Okay.

 

Mais:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

And what's the weather like in Tampa, Florida? It looks like ...

 

Mais:

Well, actually I'm scared to tell you because you might kill me.  while it's very cold over there while we're having very nice weather. It's like around 15 Celsius.

 

Edward:

Okay.

 

Mais:

Which is nice.

 

Edward:

Yeah, I think today's not too bad. I think it's probably about five degrees, so only about ten degrees difference today.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I'd take the 15 though.

 

Mais:

Well, that is too much. Actually in a few hours it's going to go up to 26, 27 or something.

 

Edward:

Okay, then we'll be angry.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, then we'll be very ...

 

Edward:

We'll call you back in a few hours to yell at you.

 

Mais:

Yeah. Okay.

 

Keiran:

Let's start this conversation. Today we're going to talk about a controversial subject. It's been in the news a lot in the last few years in Montreal, and I'm sure it's been in the news in many places around the world.

 

 

So we're going to talk about the hijab or head coverings. Mais, can you tell us right off the bat, what do you think about ... Like a lot of people have a negative opinion in the western world about them. Do you think that they kind of take away freedoms from women? Or do you think that they give the woman a certain freedom in a certain way that western women maybe don't have?

 

Mais:

Yeah, well first of all it sounds bad right now that women have, or people in general, having bad or negative opinions toward it. But actually, I can see it from the positive way. It's nice to be curious about something. At that point you start to learn about it. Then that, if that wasn't happen like people would never be curious, like why those people are covering or doing this. Right?

 

Keiran:

Right. That's interesting, I never thought of it like that.

 

Mais:

Yeah, well I'm always trying to look at the positive side for every single ... like I believe that we are blessed with something called a Islamphobia. Actually it's something good that because it raised us to go back to our religion and study more, learn more, so we can ... And that's for our good, our own benefits.

 

 

Anyways, so the hijab actually is not, it's a kind of freedom. We do it first of all because we are Muslim and we believe in God, and this is God's instructions to us so we don't argue about it. But, why it's freedom? Because we actually tried by covering our heads or tried to dress in a certain way, is covering our physical beauty and try to manifest the beauty of our personalities. Beauty of mind and so we can interact with other people, specifically the other, the opposite sex in a way that more justice, like more fairness because we gonna talk about, we will discuss issues rather than just let them focus on how we do look like. Right? Well, it's not clear, probably I didn't make it clear.

 

 

 

Mais:

Yeah?

 

Edward:

I think I understand that idea, so basically to remove any distraction to ...

 

Mais:

Exactly. For example, [inaudible 00:04:32] went to people while apply for a job if the woman looks like, not like but similar, like where she has only to show her skills and her knowledge and cover her beauty, she will be equal to the man who is applying for the same job. Both of them will have the same chance or opportunity to get the job. When she's wearing half covered, half naked, she's going to be like she'll have more chance to get the job, not because she's qualified for that, just because she looks nice.

 

Keiran:

You're saying that the hijab can allow women to be seen for their work skills and for who they are rather than just for their looks.

 

Mais:

Yeah, you can focus on my thoughts, on my knowledge, on my personality. I can't, rather than my physical beauty.

 

Edward:

It still does have to do with beauty, though, in terms of you, the hijab that you're wearing now, is nicely decorated. There's still some fashion element, some aesthetic element to it. You 

 

Mais:

Then I'm doing it wrong and I should change it. I shouldn't do this anymore. That explains why some people wear the black ones or try to cover more or try to ... The idea is to look modest, to show that decency and modesty. If you are not doing this, then you are doing it in a wrong way. You should fix it.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so that's where just a plain of black color or a dark color, that's more of a modest choice.

 

Mais:

Exactly. And some people need to cover their faces as well and their hands. It's not just my opinion but for others like the  says they have to do this as long as they're a source of infatuation. If there's a source for that then she has to do it. As long as she won't attract anyone, like I'm here in the US. No one is going to look at me because they have other options much better. Then I won't be a source of infatuation. In Jedah, for example, in Saudi Arabia, in the same city there are some places where I can't go without covering my face because otherwise all people are going to stare at me and I would be just uncomfortable with the situation.

 

Keiran:

My thing is that like in one way I understand you and I think that makes sense in a certain sense, like if a woman is wearing that then it does take away like a certain relationship where the man may just see the woman as oh, she's a beautiful thing. She's something that I can have or something, you know like. In that sense it puts you as equals. At the same time, I think if a man can only see a woman's beauty and can't like interact with her on a higher level than that, then maybe kinda shows that the man is not really in control of his own energy and his own, himself.

 

 

Let's say if you did not have your head covering on right now and I was like, "Oh, my God. Mais is ..." If I couldn't interact with you normally ...

 

Mais:

Exactly. It's just like the sign. I'm sending you a sign. We do have limits. We can be friends. We're not going to cross that limit. It's not just for certain case which is me. It's applicable on everyone else.

 

Keiran:

I know, but I'm just talking about I've heard ... This is just something that I've heard. Some people when they go through the airport in Saudi, the women that don't, they're not Muslims, they don't have head covers, they get treated very strangely for them because the men in Saudi are not used to seeing that.

 

Mais:

Yeah, they're gonna stare at them. That's why in Saudi Arabia it's better for them to cover, at least at that part. Some other places in Judah, like Abdeen and some places like coffees shops and restaurants, you would never see anyone covered unfortunately. They call themselves Muslims but you won't see any single woman is covered with her scarf. I look weird to them when I go there. Yeah, it's based on that place, where are you. In general, I'm wearing my scarf first of all to tell people I'm a Muslim. What does that mean? It means that you are going to deal with someone with good manner character. Muslims have to be honest, have to be peaceful, love others, defend others, generous, compassionate, just and the list goes on. This will give you relief that who you are going to deal with.

 

 

Your neighbor, for instance, a Muslim then you expect what you're going to see. If you saw your coworker is a Muslim, then you'll ... It is important to cover my beauty but it's not just, it doesn't stop at that point. It means a lot of other things as well.

 

Edward:

Obviously this is tradition and it has a long history to it, but why is it that men have never had to wear the equivalent of a hijab? Why is it that men don't offer the same distractions. There's a very handsome man. I don't care what he's saying. I don't care what his ideas. I'll look at his face, very handsome. Why isn't there the equivalent for men?

 

Keiran:

Because, this is my thing, but because men are not primary valued for their beauty. It's kinda a sad reality that as women ... You know this. In Asian countries like Korea, if a woman's 30 and she's not married, then she's pretty much considered finished. Its' the end of the line. Their primary value is their beauty. It's not accurate. It's not realistic. Like a woman can be beautiful and be very capable of doing many things, but that's my opinion. What do you think about that, Mais? What's your opinion about why men have never had to have a hijab?

 

Mais:

Well the men part of hijab actually is to lowering their gaze when they are going to see someone which is pretty nice or beauty. They have to lower. They shouldn't stare or keep staring or gazing at her. Why they don't cover their hair, for instance, because usually the the woman who spends most of her time and effort on fixing her hair in order to look more pretty, the men doesn't do the same thing in order to look handsome.

 

Edward:

Some men might. I mean, maybe it's more common in North American than in the Middle East, but some men will grow their hair out long and spend just as much time treating their hair as a woman.

 

Mais:

How would you look at them, like you? Don't you going to see them they are silly?

 

Edward:

Well not necessarily silly. It's not something that ... I'm not going to spend 45 minutes or an hour doing my hair, but maybe if my hair was beautiful and long and luscious, then ...

 

Mais:

I don't think it's just normal for men to do that. Actually, how a woman would look at a man, not on their faces maybe, on their buddies when they work out or look nice, okay, this is an attractive man. If he's spending time on fixing his eyebrows or his hair, it's I don't know, worse than a woman. I don't want such a man.

 

Keiran:

Right, traditionally it's seen as a bit feminine but I think it's more common in Korea. Korea is the number one seller of men's makeup.

 

Edward:

Yeah, I think men's makeup is becoming more common. Okay, to me again, I would not wear makeup because I'm not expected to wear makeup and it doesn't really appeal to me.

 

Keiran:

And you're so handsome.

 

Edward:

I'm already naturally so handsome. You know, you can see I have a beard. Sometimes I get comments from other men or from women. They say, "Oh, your beard looks nicely trimmed," as if I have worked all morning to make it perfect. But it's not true, but some people might look at me and think, "Oh, he must spend a lot of time grooming himself."  So it does relate. There are, I'm sure, some people who would think it's quite similar in terms of the effort that men and women are putting into their appearance.

 

Mais:

Again, you won't be a source of infatuation.

 

Edward:

I won't be?

 

Mais:

You won't.

 

Edward:

I'm very disappointed, then.

 

Mais:

No, you won't be. Yeah, you look nice. You look good, but okay. That's it. You're not going to do a problem, cause a problem. The hijab is more about behavior, manner. It's like speech and appearance and all. It's multiple elements together just to look modest in order to save, like the woman going to save herself, her family, and eventually the whole community or the whole society.

 

Keiran:

Let's move on quickly to one more thing. I want to talk about you said at the beginning Islamophobia is kind of like you look at it in a positive way because now people are becoming more curious about Islam. I think a lot of people probably in North America or in some European countries, their Islamophobia, maybe part of it comes from all the terrorist acts that happen once in a while, but the other part of it comes from the belief that they're not going to integrate into the culture because I think you know the religion with a lot of people is very strong. They pray five times a day. They take their religion very seriously whereas some North American people are very relaxed about their religion. I know for one thing, you are someone who has integrated very well. You go out and you connect with people in the North American culture who are not part of the Muslim world. What do you think about that? Do you think that it's important for them to integrate or do you think most people will? Do you think that this is an issue?

 

Mais:

I think what you are talking about is just available on the media or how some people try to manifest the issue. In reality, no. Did you meet or have you ever met someone who wasn't able to get involved in any issue or ...

 

Keiran:

I would say Edward and I worked at an ESL school, not at the same time but at the same school. There was many Saudi students. There was many Libyan students. I know it depends on the student. Some students there was no way they were ever going to integrate. They came to the class. They did the class. They left. They didn't really mix with other students.

 

Mais:

Do you know why?

 

Keiran:

I just think it was they were too ... I don't know. I don't know why. I think they're very deeply involved in their religion.

 

Edward:

The students that I'm thinking of, they were very conservative.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, very conservative.

 

Edward:

I had different students. I had Saudi students and the men and the women. Just one woman in particular, she chose to wear a burka, I mean a full niqab, I think even a full burka in class. She had to sit beside female students. She had to do assignments with female students because her husband was also a student there. I think she was just very conservative in her values. She would not even speak to another Saudi student's father if they met on the street. So I think she was just very, very conservative. That was her reason.

 

Mais:

Well, yeah because this is the way how she raise. Okay, then, yeah I would say she's a Muslim and she conservative, but it's not something applicable to every single Muslim. This is her case. This is her environment that she was raised on. It doesn't mean that Muslims are the same way. Muslims you're going to, when you go to the east and you visit Saudi Arabia or Syria or Jordan or Lebanon, you're going to see different things, different traditions, different environments. In Judah itself, the city where I have been raised as I told you, you're going to see different things in different societies in there. It's not about maybe religion. I don't think that Muslims cannot integrate because I hear like there is 35,000 Muslim in Tampa. It's pretty important for us. It's from our religion, actually, to go and integrate with a society, to help and interact with people because this is how we going to let people know what our religion.

 

 

Some people try just to go to see what, to find the spots where Muslims are located and just to go with them, but when you talk to the Islamic scholars they are against this idea. No, you have to reach the places where you won't find Muslims because the something? is coming from inside you. It's not something you cannot acquire it.

 

Edward:

Actually just recently in Montreal there was a news story about a man who, a Muslim man from Egypt who came to Canada who wants to start a community. Everybody's paying attention to this because his idea is to start a community, a Muslim community, but he's saying the only reason it's a Muslim community is because he wants to buy property and he figured it's easier to buy property with other people. Who does he ask first? He asks his friends who happen to be Muslim because just because they're his closest friends. Those are the people he knows. People, maybe they wouldn't pay attention to this if I decided to buy land and I asked my friends to help me. Nobody would care, but because he's Muslim it becomes, "Wait, do we want an all Muslim community only 30 minutes from Montreal? What are they going to do? What are they going to plan?"

 

 

I heard him talking on the radio and I felt sorry for him because nobody understands what he's actually trying to do. He wasn't even able to explain it clearly because he was saying one thing and then backtracking saying, "No, I will invite anybody to come but I am asking these people first. If I don't have to ask other people, I won't ask other people."

 

 

Then, "Oh, so you don't want other people."

 

 

It's hard for people, I think, just to look at the situation and not be influenced by what they already think.

 

Keiran:

The media and .

 

Edward:

The way the media covers it, too. It's not a news story but they make it a news story. People think, "Oh, then we should be worried."

 

Keiran:

Right. All right, this has been interesting but we're going to have to wrap it up because I got to actually have the ... I have a student very shortly. But Mais, thank you so much for coming on and having this discussion with us.

 

Mais:

My pleasure.

 

Keiran:

Thank you, Edward, for coming too.

 

Edward:

My pleasure.

 

Keiran:

If you guys listening to the podcast have any comments or any opinions about this subject, yeah, put it in the comment section below. We'll catch you next time on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

 

Mais:

Okay.

 

Nov 26, 2016

How to improve become more fluent in group conversations. 

Do you sometimes struggle in group conversations in English? Do you find you lose your confidence or you have trouble following? Today we discuss group conversations and a technique you can use to force yourself into the group conversation. Also we briefly compare ESL teachers and Online English teachers while I discuss the ad I launched.

Nov 23, 2016

Do you want to skip the line at the grocery store, today I teach you a sentence that helps you do this.. at least in Canada. 

 

 

**** Transcript****

 

 

Keiran:

What's up everybody? It is Wednesday! It's Wednesday, it's hump day it's a day where I don't have to work, it's a day where I can sleep all day, it's Wednesday! Hope it's going good for you. Hump day's a funny day isn't it? Because everyone's like, "Yes! The week is half over, half over!" That's kind of sad, that you hate the majority of the week, you're just like, "Oh, I just have to get through the week to get to Friday. On Friday things will be good." Then on Saturday you don't have to work. Then on Sunday you start to feel like shit because you know that Monday's coming.

 

But I love Wednesday! I don't have to work on Wednesday, but I like to work anyways, I work on my podcast, I do it for free. I work on my podcast, I don't get money, but it's fun, it's fun, it's good for you, so listen to it if you know what's good for you.

  

So today on the podcast, I want to talk about that idiom we did on Monday with Edward which was, "It boggles my mind, it boggles my mind". We're going to talk about something that boggles my mind. The thing that we're going to talk about that boggles my mind, is this thing that was in the newspaper last week, this story that happened last week. And my mom, she just kept talking about it to me, and she just kept talking about it, and talking about ... and then it's actually gone deep enough into my mind that I've been thinking about it. So I thought, "Fuck it's in there, why don't we just talk about it, right?" It's pretty silly. I'm going to read a little bit of this article to you, it was in the ... what newspaper was it anyway? Here let me find it. Okay, it was the Star. Star.com. I don't know what that is, that must be Toronto.

 

 

All right, this is the article title. "The grey what? Outcry as the grey jay named Canada's national bird. The grey jay, also known as the whiskey jack, is friendly, hardy, and intelligent ... just like Canadians," hah hah hah, "experts say."

 

 

So basically, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society had a vote about which bird people should choose to represent Canada, and they decided to choose the grey jay, and people are upset about it. They're like, "What? What the hell's the grey jay? I've never heard about that before. Why are we picking the grey jay? Why don't we pick the loon, you know, the one that goes 'woo'," which is the sound a loon makes, it's pretty cool.

 

 

Uh so people are outraged about it, they're angry, and it just boggled my mind. Why do you care so much about what bird a little group of people decided was important? It really ... it's insignificant, right? But I read a little bit about the grey jay and it's actually a pretty cool bird. It's found all over Canada. It's the only bird that's found all across Canada, I'm pretty sure. Maybe seagulls are found in ... nah, I bet seagulls aren't in the middle of Canada. And then it's very intelligent apparently, it's a hardy bird. It can withstand harsh ... a harsh environment, harsh weather. Apparently it incubates its egg in minus 30 degrees temperatures. That's amazing. So it's a good parent.

People are upset, and it just boggles my mind. These people, literally someone somewhere in the world was like, "What, the grey jay, what the fuck is that? Why didn't we ... Choose the loon, choose the snowy owl, choose the Canadian goose!" I don't think we should call the Canadian goose the Canadian goose, because it goes to Florida for the winter. I think it needs to be like the Canadian-American goose or something. Anyways, that's it about that.

 I want to share with you guys another little story, another little English sentence you can use, and I ... about two years ago when my daughter was two years old, I spent lots of time with her. There's this thing that happens with young children which you know if you ever spent a lot of time with young children, is that they are either not aware of their body or they're not good at communicating it. And you do this thing when you go anywhere with a young child, is that when you go outside, you always say, "Okay, do you need to go pee, because we're going to be in the car for a while," and then the kid will inevitably go, "No, I'm okay." Then you get in the car, and as soon as you have driven far enough from the house that you can't make it back in time for them to go to the bathroom, then they have to go to the bathroom. 

One day we were at the grocery store, and then we're in the store there shopping and my daughter's like, "Daddy, I need to go pee," and it's just like, "Oh no." I picked her up with one arm, we ran to the front of the store. I only had one thing so I went to the front of the cache and I said, "You know, do you mind if I go in front of you? My daughter really has to pee." The woman looked at me, then she looked at my hand, and she said, "Well, you only have one thing, so I you can go." I was like well, okay, I thought the pee was the main reason, but I guess it's the one thing.

 

But something clicked in my head that I can probably do this any time. Since then, I have done that many times. If I only have one or two things, I just go to the front of the line and say, "Hi, I only have this. Do you mind if I go in front of you, because I only have one thing," and usually they let you go by.

 

So I was at the grocery store on Saturday and I go, I have only one thing, I've got a pack of Shin Ramyun, which is my favorite ramen. It's a Korean ramen, it's spicy. It's not good for you, don't eat it guys, it's ... I should not be eating it either.

 

Anyways I go to the front of the line, there's two people. I go to the second person, I'm like, "Hey man, I only have one thing, do you mind if I go in front of you?" He's like, "Yeah yeah, sure." I go in front of him, and then the other person is in front of me. I look at the other person, and it's my dad. So I tap him on the shoulder, he's like, "Yep." He doesn't look back. I'm like, "Sir, do you mind if I go in front of you in line?" He's like, "Yeah sure." Then he turns around and sees me and he's like, "Hell no you're not going in front of the line!" Then the guy behind me, who already let me in front of the line, starts laughing, he goes, "Heh heh heh what an asshole." I'm like, "Yeah, I know!" Then my dad started laughing, and I was laughing, and the guy behind us was laughing. But of course, he's not going to let me go in front of me, because he ... because I'm his son, right? He doesn't care. He knows I'm not going anywhere important at that time of the day on Saturday.

 

That's it guys, so you can try that out. Let me know if that works in your country. Do you mind if I go in front of you, I only have one thing? I wonder, is this a Canadian thing, because we have a reputation for being very polite, or is this a worldwide thing that you can just butt in front of someone if you only have one thing? 

All right guys, that's the end of the podcast, so remember: it boggles my mind, use it, write a few sentences, share it with a friend, and do you mind if I go in front of you, I only have one thing, a little weird little life hack for skipping the line if you only have a few items.

 

All right, I hope you enjoyed this podcast, I'll catch you on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

Nov 21, 2016

Have you ever needed to express that you're confused in English? Here' s a great way that native speakers often do that. 

 

***Transcript***

Keiran:

Today on Uncensored English, Edward is back on the podcast and we talk about a great idiom you can use to express that you are confused about something. All right. Let's get this podcast started. The following podcast is not intended for younger audiences. It contains coarse language, adult topics, controversial ideas, and is riddled with insanity. Listeners' discretion is strongly advised. What's up everybody? This is Keiran, the Crazy Canadian, and welcome to another podcast of Uncensored English, because English isn't always PC. What's up, everyone? How's it going. Today is Monday, the ... I forgot the date, of course. Monday, the Twenty-First of November. Thank you, Edward, for giving me some nice little hand signs to let me know what date it was.

 

Edward:

No problem.

 

Keiran:

Great, and yeah, today Edward's back on the podcast. How's it going, Edward?

 

Edward:

Things are going well. How are you doing, Keiran?

 

Keiran:

I'm pretty good asides from not knowing what date it is.

 

Edward:

Now that's a little troubling, I guess.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, considering my work-

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Runs on a pretty strict schedule-

 

Edward:

All of the students that you saw today-

 

Keiran:

Oh, it's funny.

 

Edward:

Hopefully, you were in the right class.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, hopefully, it was the right students.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Anyways, today we're going to talk about a really fun idiom that has to do with confusion, and that idiom is, "It boggles my mind," or "It boggles his mind," or "It boggles-

 

Edward:

"The mind."

 

Keiran:

"The mind." Of course, it boggles the mind means, it confuses you or confuses someone-

 

Edward:

That's right, yeah. You cannot understand it.

 

Keiran:

You cannot understand how that happened.

 

Edward:

What happened?

 

Keiran:

What happened? Why it happened?

 

Edward:

Who made it happen?

 

Keiran:

I have no idea.

 

Edward:

Right.

 

Keiran:

Today I was wondering, if you can share a story with us, about something in your life that boggled your mind, or someone else's mind?

 

Edward:

Okay, let me think about boggling minds. Actually, I don't know why, but a couple of days ago, I was thinking about this story.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

In this story, my mind was not boggled, but I boggled someone else's mind.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so you confused someone else.

 

Edward:

I really did a really good job of confusing someone else, and this was back when I first went to Korea, I had only been in the country for about a week.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I was in this small town and I was going to go visit my friend in a larger city.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I had to take the train there, and I knew that there was a train station in my little town-

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I hadn't seen it. I just knew that my town was small enough that I could find it, right? What I did was, I packed my stuff, and it was like an early Saturday morning, and I just decided I was going to like walk into the middle of the town, and ask someone where the train station was.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Edward:

At this point, I could basically, in Korean, I could say, "Excuse me."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's scary.

 

Edward:

It's an interesting thing.

 

Keiran:

That's a really scary thing to do.

 

Edward:

It's an interesting experience to have, right?

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Edward:

Any language that you really don't know, in a place that you're not familiar with, you're just trying to do something so simple.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

Something we could do without even thinking about it-

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

Here, in Canada.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. I remember that in Korea, the first time I took the subway, and it was the first time I had talked to someone. I tried to talk to someone in Korean. It was probably one of the most intense moments of my life.

 

Edward:

Right.

 

Keiran:

I was alone on the subway, and there's a few people there, and I just said to this old man like, "[inaudible 00:04:24]." He's like, "Oh," and he was very happy.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I was like, "[inaudible 00:04:29]." I just started counting numbers, right?

 

Edward:

Yeah, you're just like proud of yourself-

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

For being able-

 

Keiran:

He was like, "Oh, yes."

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so what happened-

 

Edward:

Okay.

 

Keiran:

Like when you had to ask for a-

 

Edward:

All right, so I'm getting ready to leave, and I have my Korean English Dictionary.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I figure, "Okay, I'm going to see how to say train station." I look up the first word, train. [Keecha 00:04:57]. Okay, that's pretty easy, keecha. I look up the word station, and I just see YOK. The O has this little symbol over it, it's like Korean written out in English, but with special symbols-

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

For pronunciation. I don't know the pronunciation, the symbols, what they mean-

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I see YOK, and I think, "Yok."

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

"Yok," right? I'm saying, "Keecha yok, keecha yok," okay, I'm getting my stuff together. "Keecha yok, keecha yok. [inaudible 00:05:27]" That's me practicing, right?

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

I leave my apartment, I hit the street. It's early Saturday morning. No one is around. I'm walking, walking kind of towards the center of town. Finally, I see someone and it's an old man. This elderly gentleman sees me, and he's already confused, just to see me on the street, I guess.

 

Keiran:

A white man.

 

Edward:

I decided I'm going to ask him. There's nobody else around. I start, I say, "[inaudible 00:06:05] keecha yok, keecha yok," and he's looking at me. I'm like, "Keecha," and I'm making like the train movements with my arms for the wheels and-

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

Gears turning. I say, "Yok, yok, yok."

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

The man had no idea what I was talking about.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Edward:

I just kept saying, "Yok, yok," anyways, it didn't work. Okay. He had no idea. I looked at him. He was looking at me with the blankest stare you could imagine. Anyways, I just walk into town. Eventually, I find the train station, no problem, because the town was so small, but I told my Korean co-teachers about this a couple of days later. It turns out that I was saying, "Yok," instead of "Yuk."

 

Keiran:

Oh, okay.

 

Edward:

Yuk is station. Yok means swear word, so-

 

Keiran:

Oh, that's great.

 

Edward:

Initially, I thought, "Oh, was I swearing at this old man?" No, it wasn't as bad as that. I wasn't swearing at him. I was just saying, "Swear word, swear word, swear word," again and again.

 

Keiran:

Oh, that's funny, man.

 

Edward:

Anyways, I can understand why-

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Edward:

This elderly man was so confused, and why-

 

Keiran:

Yeah, you boggled his mind.

 

Edward:

I definitely boggled his mind. The whole situation was perfect for boggling his mind.

 

Keiran:

Great. That's pretty funny, and if you wonder, if you guys are wondering about boggle, I'm not actually, I probably should have [blew 00:07:49] this up before, but I just know that boggle is a classic game, right?

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

It's a word game, right?

 

Edward:

It is, and it's kind of a ... You mix up all these letters, and they randomly fall-

 

Keiran:

Right, you have like this plastic cube with all these letters, sort of in place, and then you shake it, and all the letters get mixed up, or they get boggled up.

 

Edward:

Right.

 

Keiran:

That's why you boggled his mind.

 

Edward:

That's right.

 

Keiran:

Oh.

 

Edward:

I mixed his brain right up.

 

Keiran:

Right, oh, that's funny, man. Bad word. Curse words.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I remember, I had a boggled mind once. When I was in Korea, also in Korea, I went to go see Ben, our friend, Ben. I went up there with another friend of ours, [Ally 00:08:38]. We went up to Ben's place to go, we were all going to go skiing the next day, or snowboarding, I don't remember which one we were going to do, but the night Ally and I arrived, her, I, and Ben, we all went out to a bar. We all drank a lot. We had a crazy night. We all got home. Then the next day, I just remember, I woke up and they were both just passed out. I was so, I felt so nauseous.

 

 

I'm just like, "Oh, my God. I need air." I got my jacket, and I put my jacket on, and went for like a walk, for like 20 to 30 minutes. I think it was 20 or 30 minutes, maybe it was longer. Then I came back, and then like I knocked on the door, and nobody answered the door. I knocked, and I knocked, and nobody answered the door. Then I just like I was mad, I was pounding the door, and no one answered. After a while, I gave up, and I had no idea. My mind was completely boggled, right?

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

After a while, I'm like, "Oh, I got to go get some food." I walked around the town, and I didn't know the town, I couldn't speak Korean, I didn't know anyone in there. Then I saw Brian, and Brian looked at me, and I think I looked like a mess-

 

Edward:

Brian who is Ben's friend?

 

Keiran:

Brian was Ben's friend, and I think Brian's mind was completely boggled to see me, like a hungover me, just walking around, like ah. "Brian."

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Then he, I mean, he's like, "Hey, how's it going?" Then like I told him what happened.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Then he, he's like, "Oh, just come over to my house. We'll hang out." A few hours later, like it's not fun hanging out with an older person for a long period of time.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I think his mind was completely boggled. Like, "Why am I hanging out with this hungover person?" Like at the end of the day, when Ben, and I finally found Ben and Ally like, literally, at the end of the day. Like 7 or 8 o'clock. I think Brian was there, too.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I think Brian was just like, "Ah, I'm so mad at Ben." Like Ben was, like I think Ben, Ben's mind was not boggled at all. He knew why I was mad.

 

Edward:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Why Brian was mad.

 

Edward:

What happened?

 

Keiran:

They waited for me, and they called me many times, but I had my phone in my pocket, and my phone was on silent, so it never, I never heard it. They just couldn't get in touch with me.

 

Edward:

Okay.

 

Keiran:

They decided to go skiing-

 

Edward:

Without you.

 

Keiran:

On their own.

 

Edward:

Oh, man.

 

Keiran:

Which I wasn't a fan of that decision.

 

Edward:

No.

 

Keiran:

At the same time, that didn't boggle my mind, because why would you sit around all day and wait for someone who's not answering their phone? When I was there like 20 minutes ago.

 

Edward:

Right.

 

Keiran:

Like maybe they thought I just got angry, or I was unhappy, or hungover, so I went home.

 

Edward:

Everybody's mind was boggled.

 

Keiran:

Everyone's mind was boggled.

 

Edward:

At some point in the day.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Edward:

Brian was thinking, "Why is he the one that's left to take care of you?"

 

Keiran:

He was probably, like I think his mind was probably boggled the most, because like he had to endure like a hungover person, because Ben was skiing.

 

Edward:

Okay.

 

Keiran:

Without me. I should say, "Ben and Ally," it wasn't all Ben.

 

Edward:

Right.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that was a mind boggling day.

 

Edward:

Ah, see and I think we probably had a lot of mind boggling experiences, especially early on in Korea.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, for sure. What's something that's boggled your mind recently?

 

Edward:

Something that has boggled my mind recently? Gosh, you're putting me on the spot here with another boggling story.

 

Keiran:

Let's think of short things here, like it boggles my mind that Trump was elected.

 

Edward:

Yeah, it's over a week ago, so if you would asked me this question a week ago, I think I would have been in full boggle mode. Now it's like, as strange as the situation is, you're getting used to it. You've said it a few times, so yeah, it is boggling though. Definitely-

 

Keiran:

It's mind boggling.

 

Edward:

It's mind boggling, yes. Any other boggling issues that need to be mentioned here?

 

Keiran:

I think we're out of mind boggling ideas right now. All right.

 

Edward:

I'm getting a little mind boggled.

 

Keiran:

No worries. This has been a great podcast, guys. If you guys like this, please remember, rate it, review it, subscribe to us on the podcast, share it with your friends, if you have friends who are learning English. We hope we didn't boggle your minds, but if we did, then listen to it again, and your mind will probably be less boggled.

 

Edward:

That's right.

 

Keiran:

All right. All right, guys. That's it for today and we'll catch you on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

 

Nov 19, 2016

Do you want to correct the mistakes you make while speaking a little quicker? Today we discuss error corrections, professionalism, and say hello to a special guest.

***No transcript, video available on youtube channel --> 

Nov 17, 2016

Learn how to do a long warm heartfelt thank you, with lots of jokes and laughs. 

 

***Transcript***

Speaker 1:

What's up everybody? Today is Wednesday, November the 16th. How are you doing? How's it going as you walk along the street, listening to this podcast. Maybe you're going for a jog. Maybe you're going for a run. Maybe you're making breakfast. Maybe you are lying in bed, but not if you're Areil. I know she said she doesn't listen to my podcast when she's lying in bed, because my voice is too unstable and she can't sleep with that, so she listens to a more relaxing podcast, one that won't frighten her when she's trying to sleep.

 

 

How's it going, guys? It's November the 16th. Yes, it's hump day, it's hump day. Hump day is the end ... It's not the end. It's the middle of the week. Just like a camel has a hump in the middle of its back, Wednesday is the hump of the work week. We are over the hump. We're over the hump, guys. You made it to Wednesday. Congratulations. You've got two more days of bull crap. Then it's the weekend. You can do what you want. Congratulations.

 

 

Today's going to be a really weird podcast. Today all I'm going to do on the podcast is something I think I should have done a long time ago. I'm just going to thank you guys. I'm going to thank all you people out there for listening to the podcast, for encouraging me to do the podcast and my videos also, and for inspiring me, because I couldn't have done this alone, and I got a lot of people to thank, and I'm going to thank them one by one, and it's going to get funny at some point, so don't worry. It won't be too fucking boring.

 

 

I'm going to stop right at the top. I'm going to start right at the top with my student, and I'm going to talk, I'm going to thank Boris for being my first student. You were amazing. You were fun. I'm happy I could help you land that job in that company where you work now, where you're probably bored of working now, because you've been there for about a year, but thanks, man, for being my first student. Resul, my student from Turkmenistan, you are one crazy atheist, buddy, I'm really impressed by how you learned English. You were probably the most passionate student I've ever had. I learned so much from you, man. You're also fucking nuts. That's why I love you.

 

 

Irina. Irina from Moscow. Irina, I know you are sailing around the world right now. You're probably not going to listen to this. Maybe you'll never listen it. We were supposed to meet up in Montreal. I did drive down to the port. I couldn't find your boat. I was disappointed to not meet you, but I'm glad you landed a job and that our English sessions helped you out.

 

 

Alisa, also in Moscow, thank you for sending me all those amazing Russian students. I hope you're ... I hope my podcast has helped you. I hope you learned something from it. You have such amazing students. I don't know where you find these people.

 

 

Alisa, another Russian student, also ... She's not in Moscow. I don't know where you are. Actually I do know where you are. I'm not going to say where you are. That's nobody's business, but thanks for being a great student and for sharing the struggles of parenthood with me. I hope you're enjoying your life.

 

 

Ying, for helping me out with the Macbook. Oh my God, you saved my life and this podcast, so everyone else who listens to this has to say thank you to you, and for showing me how quickly a person can improve their language if they just work hard at it. It's amazing. You're an amazing student.

 

 

Ruben, you are one of my best students. I always had such fun talking to you. I learned a lot from you. Thank you for taking me to Teneriffe so many times, man. I know those flights aren't cheap. Well, they're free for you, but hey, I've never been there and now I've been there several times, and I can tell that to all my friends, and they're jealous, even though I actually haven't physically been there, but I've been there, and it's been cool going there.

 

 

Mellita, for teaching me the value of customer service and customer care, thank you so much. Those sessions we did together were very valuable for me. I learned a lot. I hope I helped you improve your English as much as you wanted to, and also for sharing all those amazing stories about all those concerts you've been to. Holy crap, I'm so jealous.

 

 

Monica, for being so brave in your life. You're an inspiring person, for going to Canada without knowing anyone there, not really knowing what you were getting into, doing the video challenge first, constantly pursuing what you want. It's an amazing way to live your life. I know it's not easy, but staying in a job you're not happy in is not ever going to be fulfilling.

 

 

Craig and Robert, my Polish pair, just for being Craig and Robert, you guys are great students. You're funny. You're intelligent. I've learned a lot from you guys.

 

 

Ariel, for being a great student and sharing all your interesting, amazing stories that you come up with, that you write. I think you are secretly one of Taiwan's best writers, and in the future maybe. Maybe that's what you should be pursuing. I don't know. Actually, I don't want to suggest things. I just think your stories are great.

 

 

Alex, in Colombia, man, in Bogota. I hope I said that properly. I'm sure I didn't. Keep going. Your English is going to improve a lot. Keep studying. Keep listening to yourself. Keep working at it.

 

 

Pavel. Haven't seen you in a while. You're a great student. You're a diligent student. You know what you want. You go after that. It's amazing. Thanks for sharing all those amazing interesting articles. The one about Elan Musk, the one about the spiderwebs, that just blew my mind. I hope those cats are doing well, too. I hope they're keeping you company, over in Montenegro.

 

 

Yasuyo, for being ... You are such an inspiration. It's amazing to see someone just pursue their goal and achieve them quickly. That's amazing. Keep going, you're doing great.

 

 

Dasha, I hope you're doing well. I know you were sick recently. You're a great student. I'm really, I was really disappointed I couldn't go to your wedding. It was a little far and I was pretty busy, but Edward told it was great, and I hope you're not having a hard time with all that stupid government shit that you got to do when you move across the world.

 

 

Vladimir. Vladimir Vladimir. I know that's not your second last name, but it's funny, for sharing lots of information with me about Russian traditions, Russian culture, and all those great cocktail recipes, and our great conversations. Keep it up, man. You're doing fantastic.

 

 

Anastasia, for amazing talks on [inaudible 00:07:24], sharing and teaching me about Singlish, that crazy, cute language, and just our opinions. We've had some really great, deep conversations. You're improving a lot. I know sometimes people out there don't feel like they're improving, but you got to put the time in, and it happens gradually. Just keep going.

 

 

Kostya, for educating me about small Russian cities. I don't know if we can call it a city. I guess you're the expert on that, but it looks like a city, with that population size you told me about.

 

 

Alexander Freeman. I don't know if that's how you ... It can't be your name, man. That's got to be a fake name. Anyways, your car you built is sick, it's impressive, man. Keep going with your English. You're a great student, and you have a great mindset. I would be a little worried about your car, because it's a really cool car, and I assume maybe Putin's going to steal it if he finds out about it, so maybe I should take this podcast down after I put it up.

 

 

Who else? Stefan, Stefano, in Italy, man. You're a model student. You always do your work. It's great. Keep going. You're going to have a great time when you get over there in the U.S. Don't worry about the Trump thing.

 

 

Then all those strangers in the private Facebook page, who I don't know who you are. I don't know who you are. You're there. I know you're listening. I don't know who you are. Who are you? Tell us who you are? We need to know? Anton, who are you? Are you a spy? Are you a spy, Beatrice? Bea is Spanish. Beatrice? I don't know. Beatrice, are you a spy? Maybe you guys are all spying together. Maybe you guys are colluding or something. I don't know. Tigris, I got to be butchering that name. I don't know who you guys are. Who are you? Tell us who are you.

 

 

Of course, Mais. I'm so happy that I could help you pass that stupid piece of shit TOEFL test. I hate those things. It's a scam. They're just taking money off people. You're an awesome person. Keep pursuing your goals. Keep going for it. I'm just so happy that I could have helped you, and that you motivate me a lot. You're one of those people who just knows what they want and they go after it. Keep going, and I know that exam you have to do is a lot of work coming up, but keep doing it, man. Keep going after it.

 

 

Okay, and all those Chinese students who have a hard time hearing me because your government is insane and they block a lot of stuff outside of your country ... Actually, you're not the only one with the insane government. Korea blocks a lot of stuff, too. That's Grace, Yonghao, Chelsea, Swen, Martian, keep going guys, keep studying, keep improving your English.

 

 

Oh fuck, I'm probably forgetting a few people. If I'm forgetting you, don't feel like I forgot you. It's not that I forgot you, it's just that in the moment I forgot you, but I remember you, just not right now. I'm going to remember you later, when the podcast's finished. "Oh, shit, I forgot that person."

 

 

Who else? Kinga, for all those great conversations we had. Your English is really good. It can improve a small little bit, but keep going. You're a great student, too. Birgit, haven't spoken to you in a while. I hope you're still listening. You're a passionate person. You inspire me to learn language. Keep going with your English. I hope you've reached that level that you were going for when we stopped our student-teacher relationship.

 

 

I think that's everybody I wanted to mention. I'm sure I forgot people. If I forgot you, I didn't forget you. I just forgot you right now. I wanted to make one small announcement. If you're in that private Facebook page, I hope you value it. I hope you value those weekly videos I'm putting up, because I'm officially closing that page to new people, except for new students of mine. I recommend if you're not in there you ask me about it and you get in, because I've put up some really useful, great videos that can help you learn language every week. Actually, the one this week is going to be more entertainment value.

 

 

I'm closing it for a bit. It's a little project of mine, and in the future it's going to be open again to other people, but it's mainly just for my paying students now. If you're in there, I hope you value it, and if any of my students, you guys are in there, if you ever want to ask me questions, just shoot me a question. I'll answer as soon as I can.

 

 

That's it for the podcast for today, guys. I have one small favor to ask of you. I have a small favor to ask of you guys. I've been doing this podcast for nearly a year. I've put out a hundred and five podcasts. I've made eight or nine video podcasts. I hope you guys have valued these, and I'd really like to ask all you people out there listening to give me some feedback, because in the next four or five months I'm going to be creating some programs to help English language learners out there, and I want to know what do you want to improve. What is interesting to you? I have a few ideas bouncing around in my head, but I want you to let me know which ones are most appealing to you. I'm just going to reel some of these off right off from the top of my head, and tell me if any of these are interesting to you.

 

 

One that I've already started making is a program on curse words, bad language, and slang. It's an audiobook. It's probably going to have a few videos that go along with it. I have another project I'm pushing around in my head, which is how to have great conversations in English. It's a book of great conversation questions and techniques to get conversations going. Then I have a third one, which is tales of crazy Canadians. This is going to be stories from people I know, from their lives, great stories with great expression, idioms, phrasal verbs, all in audio format along with the transcript, so you can read along.

 

 

Oh shit, I had a few more. I had a few more. One was just going to be self-study course on how to learn a language faster and in a deep, effective way. I think that's it, man. There's another one. I know I'm missing it, but that's it. That's it for now. If there's something that you want to learn that I haven't mentioned, something appealing to you, tell me about it, because I'm going to be building courses very soon, and I want to know what to work on. What's useful for you guys? What areas do you guys want to improve? You guys can send me an email to tell me this information, or if you're in the private Facebook page you can just put it in the comment section below, but if you're not, you can send me an email at uncensored.english.ca@gmail.com. That's uncensored.english.ca@gmail.com. Send me an email there. Tell me what you want, and also, if there's anything you don't like in the podcast, like the intro music is uncomfortable to listen to, or there's some problems you think I haven't weeded out yet, let me know.

 

 

All right, guys, I know this podcast was a weird format, but it's a one-off. It's not going to be happening again. Please give me some feedback. I love you guys. Have a great night, and we'll catch you next time on the next episode of Uncensored English.

Nov 14, 2016

Learn how to sound just a tad more fluent with a really simple idiom, plus we talk to an American about that silly election.

 ***Transcription***

 

 

Keiran:

All right. What's up everybody? Welcome to the Uncensored English Monday Podcast for November the 14th. And today, we have Max back on the podcast. How is it going, Max?

 

Max:

Hey, really good. How you doing, Keiran?

 

Keiran:

I'm doing good. I'm doing good. What'd you get up to on the weekend this week?

 

Max:

I saw a UFC fight on Saturday night.

 

Keiran:

Nice. Like in a bar or?

 

Max:

Oh yeah, sitting in a bar. Sorry. We didn't go to see it live, didn't go to Madison Square Garden.

 

Keiran:

Okay. Yeah. It's a little bit of a trek from Montreal.

 

Max:

Yeah, yeah. I'm not quite at that pay scale yet.

 

Keiran:

Alright. Last week on ... I think it was Wednesday. We did a podcast about the election, and you are the first American person I talked to about the election. And why don't you just ... You're living there. You're an American citizen. Why don't you just share your thoughts about what happened, man?

 

Max:

I think there was a lot of umm confusion between the different people just you know per state, and a lot of people, in my opinion, voted for change, and I think probably presidential candidate at the time, Donald Trump looked like he was giving a bigger message that he was going to change things and try to make things different, but ah Hillary, the democratic ... Hillary Clinton, democratic candidate,  ah looks like she wasn't really sending that same message, so she lost people's uh favor.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. I think also that people are just sick of politicians like Trump just doesn't seem like a politician.

 

Max:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

He seems like a ... Maybe not the brightest like he's like ... You see, he comes across very honest, and I think people maybe think he has a successful track record in business. Maybe he can use that to improve the country or something.

 

Max:

Yeah. I think people were definitely thinking that. They're really hoping for that business savvy.

 

Keiran:

All right. Okay, great. Last week, we talked about umm this expression, "Rub me the wrong way," and I was saying how Donald Trump rubs me the wrong way, but also, Hillary rubs me the wrong way. I'm curious. Do either of those people rub you the wrong way in any sort of manner?

 

Max:

Umm no, no. They're just politicians. It's a different game. It's not something that I should take personally at all so.

 

Keiran:

Okay. Donald's hair doesn't rub you the wrong way?

 

Max:

It looks ugly, that hair. That hair rubs me the wrong way. Definitely ugly hair. Yeah, yeah.

 

Keiran:

Okay. I wanted to continue today with another expression that's very similar to, "Rub me the wrong way." It's, "Rubbed off on you," or, "Rubbed off on me."

 

Max:

Oh yeah.

 

Keiran:

Can you explain real quickly what does, "Rubbed off on you," mean?

 

Max:

"Rubbed off on you." If somebody rubbed off on me, it means pretty much that I've adopted some of their characteristics you know by spending time with them.

 

Keiran:

Right. In your recent life or like in the last few years, can you think of ... Who's the person who you think has rubbed off on you the most?

 

Max:

Oh man, loaded question. Umm.. that's a tough ...

 

Keiran:

Wait, wait, wait. Wait, wait, wait. What's a loaded question? People might not know that.

 

Max:

A loaded question is a question with a lot of meaning behind it, so if I answer it wrongly, it wouldn't be as ... It's got a lot of weight behind it.

 

Keiran:

Okay. Let's do something to take the pressure off you. Let's take off ... take me another question because I don't want to ... I don't know, aside from ... Maybe people who you know who I don't know in your personal life, who has rubbed off on you the most in, in the last year?

 

Max:

Okay. Let's say my buddy Stefan has rubbed off on me the most in the last year. I learned a lot about the way he thinks about, ah you know situations and the way he patiently think things through. It's not my strongest suit.

 

Keiran:

Right. Do you think you rub off on him at all?

 

Max:

Yeah, definitely. I think he's got a ... He's a little bit more ... How do you say it? A little more expressive about his needs. He doesn't spend as much time thinking about it, and he knows quickly how he feels about things.

 

Keiran:

Ah that's great, man. I think that's another area where I've had a weakness in the past is like sometimes, instead of just communicating with someone or getting the issue out in the open, you think about it too much.

 

Max:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

When you think about it too much, sometimes it builds into something that it actually isn't, and it turns into a terrible situation.

 

Max:

Right. It becomes a big deal even though it was a small thing that you weren't sure you cared about, but actually you did, and you waited too long to say it.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, yeah. Exactly. So what else has rubbed off on you? It's not only people that rub off on you. Has anything else rubbed off on you in the last year?

 

Max:

Mmm.. I guess work life has rubbed off on me, really forcing me to get more organized in a lot of ways that I never expected to. Planning weeks in advance for simple meetings.

 

Keiran:

Right. That's that's probably a good thing in some ways. You know what's weird? I noticed that since I stopped comedy, I think I've become less lazy.

 

Max:

Really?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and that doesn't surprise me because ... If you think about the group of comedians we hang out with, the vast majority of them are unemployed or like semi-employed.  And they're brilliant people, but I think it's a stereotype and it's generalizations, but there's a lot of lazy comedians.

 

Max:

Definitely. I would even say that I, myself, am a bit of a lazy comedian. I .

 

Keiran:

I would agree with you. You are lazy.

 

Max:

I don't even have a writing routine. Gosh, thank you, but I don't ... I didn't say that expecting you to say the opposite. I actually mean it. I don't have a writing routine. And you know they say your friends rub off on you, so the people you keep near you, you're going to adopt their traits.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Max:

If you hang out with people who are super motivated, always pushing each other, you might become competitive and motivated as well and push as well to get ahead of them and them ahead of you in terms of race.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Max:

If your friends are lazy, that will rub off on you, and you get lazy too.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and that's one thing I love about being a private tutor online is I meet so many amazing people, and a lot of these people are really motivated or really accomplished. And I feel like just by being in their presence, some of those things rub off on me.

 

Max:

What what student, if I can ask you a question, has rubbed off on you let's say in the last year?

 

Keiran:

Oh man. Well, i can't really say names, but ...

 

Max:

Sure.

 

Keiran:

I think that, I'm going to talk about it soon. There's actually a student I've had who I've started teaching recently, and he is just so diligent, and he really ... Whatever exercise I ask him to do, he just does it in such a deep way, like I think we learn this method of studying in school where you have to learn something, and then move on to something, and then learn something, and move on to something. And we had that in language schools. You would have to teach like two pages a day, which is dumb because you can't learn something properly if you only look at it for two days.

 

Max:

Right.

 

Keiran:

And I... you know just by witnessing this student like take this one audio file and like work on it for like a week or two weeks, I've been applying that to my French studying, and I've been seeing amazing results.

 

Max:

That's fantastic.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Max:

It's actually kinda like a deep learning. You don't just ... It's like if you were reading a book. You wouldn't just read it once and assume you knew all of it. You'd go back, and read it slowly, and look for different kind of morals and ideas in it, right?

 

Keiran:

Right. Right, exactly.

 

Max:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

And it's it's really like I'm just happy that that like trait has rubbed off on me because if I want to master anything, whether it's comedy, or teaching, or any other like life project or skill, you gotta, you gotta do it whatever you're doing like 110%.

 

Max:

Yeah. Yeah, and take your time doing it, right? I think that's the takeaway.

 

Keiran:

All right. Let's have some fun here. Let's create a few sentences just out of our minds with the expression, "Rubbed off on."

 

Max:

Okay.

 

Keiran:

All right. I'm drawing a blank here. You want to go first?

 

Max:

Yeah, i got one. I was having a really bad day, and it became a really bad month, and then I saw every time I came home, my dog was so happy. It really rubbed off on me, and i decided to be more happy just like my dog.

 

Keiran:

Aw, that's cute. You're such a sweetie pie, Max.

 

Max:

I'm a softie.

 

Keiran:

All right. Two year ago, when my wife went to Mongolia with my daughter, I decided to do as much comedy as i could and i started to hang out with Gabriel and Max more, and heavy drinking really started to rub off on me.

 

Max:

Yeah. Keiran's students, listen. That was a weird way to use that. We could try again.

 

Keiran:

Okay. Gabriel's heavy drinking really rubbed off on me.

 

Max:

Two years ago, this is me, Max. I started drinking heavily, and the lack of discipline and organization that my friends represented really rubbed off on me. Because I let myself go, I also ... Maybe we're not the best examples since we were doing this probably at the same time.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. Well, whatever. It's fun and it's a good example.

 

Max:

I'm just kidding, just kidding.

 

Keiran:

Let's just summarize this for the guys out there. Rubbing off on someone means you are influencing them, and if they rub off on you, that means you are being influenced by them probably just because you're around them a lot.

 

Max:

Right, and sometimes it's because you want those traits. Not always, but if you want to be like someone else that you spend time with, you will learn how they do it, and you will emulate it. You'll copy it.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, especially, yeah, if you witness it and you really ... You're just aware when you're around them. You can pick it up.

 

Max:

A good one  is growing up with your parents. I'm sure you've got a lot of traits, Keiran, that your parents have and you didn't even try.

 

Keiran:

Oh my god. I got my mom's worst trait which is she just loses like everything.

 

Max:

Oh, no.

 

Keiran:

Like every day, she loses her keys. Like every day, and we're just like ... I'm just like, "Please, just put it on the key rack." She's like, "Well, I always put it in my purse, or in the glove compartment, or I leave it in the ignition, or I put it on the counter, or I put it in my bag." I'm like, "Okay, so it's not in one of those six places. Where in like ...?"

 

Max:

Yeah, Keiran. I think that one might be genetic, buddy. Sorry.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. I don't know. Probably. My dad never loses shit.

 

Max:

No, no. I'm serious. I think it could be like ... You just learn that behavior of just dropping your stuff wherever.

 

Keiran:

But it's weird because when I lived on my own, I didn't lose shit as much, so I'm happy. I'm excited to be getting out of here soon because I think that problem will ... Like I don't have it that bad, but every once in a while, I do lose my wallet.

 

Max:

Ah, that's a bummer. It could be also when you're in a smaller place, it's harder to lose things.

 

Keiran:

Right, right. All right. We're going to wrap this podcast up, so guys, if you've liked this podcast, rate it, review it. If you're in the private Facebook page, feel free to test out this expression in the comment sections below. As always, you can record yourself saying some sentences if you want some corrections on pronunciation or grammar, or you can just write a few sentences down and I'll still point out what you're doing right or wrong. And that's it, man. You want to say toodaloo, Max, or give a goodbye to all these people out here?

 

Max:

I'll take your lead. Toodaloo, everyone. Toodaloo.

 

Keiran:

All right. We'll catch you on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

Nov 12, 2016

How do Eastern and Western people and cultures differ? Today Keiran and Edward discuss stereotypes and generalizations by contrasting their own experience. For more context open the link at the end of this description.

 http://ism.intervarsity.org/resource/east-vs-west-cultural-comparison

Nov 9, 2016

Learn a simple, fun, easy to use phrasal verb that is incredibly common. Today we discuss the presidential election, Trump and how you can sound more like a native speaker with this expression.

 

***Transcript***

 

What's up everybody? How's it going? I hope you're doing well. Today is Wednesday, November the 9th. It is one day after election day, or I guess it is kind of the day of the election that it has been decided. And what did I tell ya? What did I tell ya? I told all my students. None of them believed me. I told all my friends. None of them believed me. I told my family. None of them believed me, but Trump won. Trump won, so I gotta say. I gotta say I told you so. I told you so.

 

 

I told you so is an expression that it's probably not something you need to say most of the time, but it's just something you say to someone when you had one opinion and they had another opinion, and you ended up being right. It's kind of childish, but I told you so. I knew I was right man. Trump won. I don't know. I don't really think it's a big deal. Both of those candidates were pretty shitty, right? So whether they chose him or her, they're still getting a shitty president in the long run.

 

 

So, what do you think's going to happen? I don't know. There is one thing for sure is that Trump rubs me the wrong way. Does Trump rub you the wrong way? I think Trump rubs a lot of people the wrong way. What do you think that means, Trump rubs me the wrong way? It sounds kind of dirty in a way. It doesn't mean something dirty. It means that Trump, there's something about him that I don't like. There's something about him that I don't trust. That's what we mean when we say someone rubs us the wrong way, so I'm pretty sure Trump rubs most of all people the wrong way. Maybe it's because he's been the president of all his companies for I don't know 10, 20, 30 years, and he's used to having like the final say. I think he's very used to getting his way. That he can't really take an honest criticism.

 

 

Maybe that's what rubs me the wrong way about Trump. I mean you're going to have someone who's gonna  supposedly lead a country. You want that person to be able to look accurately at themselves, right. Maybe they will make a whole bunch of bad decisions, but they won't be aware of it because they can't take a criticism. So that's probably the main thing that rubs me the wrong way about Trump other than the fact that he's just blatantly racist. That also rubs me the wrong way.

 

 

But I think most people are probably a little bit racist in some way or another. So what rubs you the wrong way about Trump? What rubs you the wrong way about Trump? I'm sure there's lots of things that rub you the wrong way about Trump. If you guys are listening to the podcast inside of the private Facebook page, write it down. Write it down in the comments section below. What rubs you the wrong way about Trump? Did you watch those electoral debates? They were pathetic, man. It's so sad to see like that we all pay attention to this.

 

 

That's the first time I've ever watched any kind of American politics, and I was just ... I thought it was amazing about how childish they are, you know. That's another thing that rubs me the wrong way about both of them. It just seems so childish. If we had a presidential election for a classroom of like kindergartners, I think they would have better arguments. I think they might be better leaders than these two.

 

 

All right, guys. This is going to be a short podcast, so the expressions we did today were rub you the wrong way. It rubs you the wrong way. What rubs you the wrong way about Trump? And then the second one we did was I told you so. It's a popular thing to say when you're right. It's also a juvenile thing to say when you're right. Actually it's probably something that Donald Trump says a lot when he's right. But hey, I had to say I told you so because I knew that this was going to happen.

Nov 7, 2016

Think Canada is one of the best countries to live in? You may be right… but you may be wrong....
Listen in on Melissa and Keiran as they discuss a surprising discovery that happened just last week. Subscribe & Get the FREE transcript at UncensoredEnglish.ca

 

*** Transcript *** 

Keiran:

All right. Today we have Melissa back on the podcast.

How's it going, Melissa?

 

Melissa: Good, Keiran. How are you?

 

Keiran: I'm all right. I'm all right. What's new with you?

 

Melissa: Not too much. I had a long day at work today, but I don't feel so bad because it's raining outside.

 

Keiran: Ok. It's not the worst day to be locked inside.

 

Melissa: Yes. Exactly.

 

Keiran:

All right. All right. Today, we have a not so pleasant topic we're going to talk about. Melissa is unaware of what it is. It is a little bit gross. If you're a squeamish person, if you're a person who doesn’t like graphic descriptions of things, maybe you should stop listening to the podcast now. If you have the courage to go ahead, maybe we should start now. 

Are you ready to hear about this article, Melissa?

 

Melissa:

Sounds like I'm in for a treat.

 

Keiran:

Yes. You are.

I read this a few days ago in the newspaper. It's about a retirement home in Ottawa. I'm not going to read the title because it gives away everything. Actually, it's all in the first paragraph anyway. Let's just start it off. 

 

"Staff at an Ottawa nursing home, recently discovered that maggots had infested a resident's leg wound, landing the woman in hospital, horrifying her family and triggered a police investigation. The Ottawa police force said Tuesday, it's elder abuse unit has had deemed the incident to be a noncriminal matter. But the discovery suggesting flies laid eggs and larvae hatched in the sore before anyone noticed, raises a new question about the quality of care in Canadian long-term facilities."

Okay. Melissa. What do you think about that?

Melissa:

That's sad.

Keiran:

Yes. It's sad and it's pathetic in my mind.

Melissa:

My gosh. How? So in order for a fly lay any type of eggs, or for larvae to grow, the wound must have been open long enough for that to happen and flies would have to land on it.

Keiran: Right.

Melissa: That's disturbing.

 

Keiran:

Right. It says here in the article, "It takes days for fly larvae to reach a full grown stage. Something that should not happen in a properly treated patient." 

Ummm... so basically this woman ... I think what happened is that she had a wound, and she was just was neglected or no one treated her for a few days.

 

Melissa: Absolutely.

 

Keiran: And uh ..I mean, it's this issue that I talk about with many of my students about retirement homes. I don't know. Have you been to any of them recently? Do you have any family in retirement homes?

 

Melissa: I have my Grandma who's in a retirement home, yeah. And I go and visit her once and awhile.

 

Keiran: Yes. One of my grandmas is in there too. Well, I should say my Grandma. The other one is dead. She can't be in the retirement home.

 But I just thing the place is so depressing. There's a wide variety of people ... this I think  is the end of the road home. Before this, I think she was in a more active home with healthier people. In this one, there is just bunch of people in wheelchairs parked in front of TVs and a lot of people can't ... they're really losing their wit or their bodily functions. And, I think that these places probably speed up the mental deterioration of the people who live there.

 

Melissa: Absolutely. Yeah. The lack of emotional support and intellectual stimulation, is really gonna to accelerate the process because people don't really want to be around there. What kind of environment would you want to keep living in if it's terrible?

Keiran: I remember ... you always hear about ... that's neglect, right? This situation is neglect. This woman was not taken care of properly. They probably didn't know that the wound needed to be cleaned or something.

You also hear about abuse. Patients who are just mad at old people. Old people get senile. Maybe they become difficult. They're kind of like kids after a certain point; like really young kids.

Melissa: Umhmm  

Keiran : What's the solution? Obviously, this situation doesn't work.

 

Melissa: I mean, I think it's a societal responsibility. It's a civil responsibility. The way a society should take care of homeless people and of children, it's society's responsibility to take care of elderly people. And it's not a priority of modern societies. But I think it should be a little but more than it is.

Keiran:

It's scary. I think for myself, my Grandma is pretty lucky, because she has one of her daughters lives in that town that her home is in. And then my mom lives about an hour away. They take turns taking care of her. She sees someone almost everyday. I think most people don't get that in a retirement home.

 

Melissa: You're right. Most people don't. Even if you think bout how demanding life is in general, even if you're an adult and you have kids. And then never mind trying to go spend time with elderly people, or grandmothers or grandparents it ends up being difficult. That's why the solution has to be societal one. To allow people the time to support a part of society that's growing older.

 

Keiran: There's also the situation that I think a huge part of our society is growing older. Which is a bad situation, right? The youth is smaller and the seniors ... the size of the population has grown a lot because people live longer now. 

 

Melissa:

Yeah, and I read an article not too long ago. It was really interesting; trying to find simple solutions to alleviate some of the problems. This article was about how school children came into the nursing home to play with the people and to get to know them; to play games and play cards and play all these things. It ended up being a mutually beneficial environment because the elderly people felt engaged and entertained. The kids, it provided them people to talk to and play games. It ended up being a win-win situation. I think if we spent just a little bit of time to think about solutions, we can come up with some that are innovative and really quite simple.

Keiran:

I always thought that they should just put daycare in the same building as a retirement home.

Melissa: Yeah

Keiran: Kids that age are not judgmental. Older people have nothing to do. Why not just put them together?

Melissa:

Put them together.

 Keiran:

Let them fight it out and have fun with each other.

 Melissa:

How rejuvenating would it be to have your life infused with the youthfulness and energy of young kids? I think that would be an example of a simple thing, if you want to call it simple, solution as opposed to ... we always think that money is the solution though. If you put more money into the system it will help. It doesn't have to be money. There are lots of creative way that we can find simple solutions that can make it better.

Keiran:

Let's switch things up here and have a fun question to end it off on. 

How would you like to die? 

Melissa:

How would I like to die? That's such a good question. I've never thought about it, but I would like to die doing something that's really exciting; that gets my adrenaline pumping. Be it ...

Keiran:

Picking maggots out of a wound on your leg?

Melissa:

Yes. That is definitely not the way I'd want to die. 

Like a really difficult rock climbing problem. Or doing a really difficult physical exercise.

Keiran:

Yes. That would be fun, right?

Melissa:

So it's sudden. You end up dying in a happy moment.

 

Keiran:

On a high?

 

Melissa:

Exactly. On a high.

 

Keiran:

I wouldn't want to die in a home. That's my nightmare. I don't want to be just lying around waiting like, "When will it come?" To me, that's the most terrible scenario ever.

 

Melissa:

No kidding.

 

Keiran:

I think I want to die in an airplane crash. I think that's kind of exciting, you know? Then you can die with lots of other people at the same time, so it's like a big group activity.

 

Melissa:

The process of the plane coming down and everybody screaming, that would be freaking me out.

 

Keiran:

It only lasts like a minute or something. You might even just die on the way down from shock.

 

Melissa:

Yeah, well you know what, as long as I have Chris next to me, that'd be fine.

 

Keiran:

All right. That's very romantic.

 

Melissa:

Yes.

 

Keiran:

All right. Anyways, thanks for coming on this podcast and having this casual conversation about leg maggots and death.

 

Melissa:

Thanks Keiran. Thanks for having me.

 

Keiran:

All right, guys. I hope you guys enjoyed this podcast. Remember, you can get the transcript for it on the website. If you liked it, rate it. Review it.

 

 

We'll catch you next time on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

Nov 5, 2016

How to use the common and useful expression "in the world", plus Keiran complains about another shitty language partner. Lastly he rambles about random things.

 

*** No Transcript for this one, but feel free to write one as a challenge to yourself and the send it to me***

Nov 2, 2016

It's finally here, Episode number 100... sort of, the switchboard operator challenge. Today I call up a bunch of switch board operators and attempt to spark up some random conversation.

*** Transcript***

Keiran

All right, what's up everybody? Today is finally podcast number 100 and that means today we are going to be doing the switchboard challenge, which is a challenge for me not for you.

 

 

You can just sit back there and relax and I've got about 5 phone numbers here I'm going to try calling. The phone numbers belong to various Fortune 500 companies in the US. I'm going to call all 5 of them. I'm going to hopefully get ahold of someone to talk to. Hopefully they're not all run by automated systems, although they might be.

 

 

But we'll find something, don't worry.

 

 

In case we don't, you know I got Gabriel's numbers here. Just in case we don't get in touch with anyone. And I think I'll also call my mom, just for fun, you know. We'll prank call both of those people.

 

 

I'm going to actually talk to the switchboard operators, but if I don't get ahold of these people then I'm going to prank call Gabriel with the switchboard. I mean the soundboard. An Arnold Schwarzenegger soundboard. He's going to pick up the phone and I'm going to say something like, "Good morning, how are you?" "If I'm not me, who the hell am I?"

 

 

And other stuff like that. You get the point.

 

 

All right, so let's do this. I used to have to do this 8 hours a day for ... the whole day. I hated it. I hated doing this. But we're just going to do it for fun. I'm going to try to have conversations with these people. It might not work, because a lot of these people, they just do what I just described to you. They just sit there the whole day. They answer the phone. Nobody wants to talk to them. They're probably in a bad mood. They probably hate what they're doing. But we're going to see. And worst case scenario, we're going to prank call Gabriel or my mom or someone else.

 

 

So I've got the first number ready here. We're calling the Hilton Hotel head office, somewhere in the US. All right, let's do this.

 

 

All right. It's going. I'm calling them on Skype, so they don't know my number.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Female 1:

Good afternoon, thank you for calling. You have [inaudible 00:02:16] how can I help you?

 

Keiran:

Hi, how are you doing?

 

Female 1:

Wonderful. How are you?

 

Keiran:

I'm pretty good. What are you up to?

 

Female 1:

I'm just answering the telephone. How can I help you?

 

Keiran:

I'm not really calling for any purpose. I'm just calling around because I'm bored, trying to talk to someone.

 

Female 1:

Okay. Well, I'm sorry. I'm working. I can't sit here and talk to you.

 

Keiran:

But if you hang up doesn't that mean that you just talk to someone else?

 

Female 1:

Yes, sir, but I got other people that need to get through.

 

Keiran:

Through to where? (both laugh)

 

Female 1:

Have a wonderful day. Bye.

 

Keiran:

All right, have a good one. Bye bye.

 

 

All right, that one didn't really go very far. Let's see if I can try to get a better conversation out of the next person.

 

 

All right, so that didn't work very well. We're going to try another one out this time. I think I'm going to role play. I think I'll be more comfortable doing that.

 

 

I'm going to call Walmart. I'm going to put in the number right here. And my whole shtick for this call is I'm going to pretend to be some small town person, and I'm calling up Walmart because I want to have a Walmart in my town. I'm going to try to get the switchboard operator to recommend a Walmart in my town even though that's not their job. They're just going to tell me, "Sir, I can't do anything but connect you to the person you want to talk to." So let's see what happens here.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Automated 1:

This call may be monitored or reported to assure quality service or for other business purposes ...

 

Keiran:

They're recording me. I'm recording you too.

 

Automated 1:

Thank you for calling one of our store's corporate offices. If you are calling for Walmart.com or ... (Keiran presses button)

 

Female 2:

Thank you for calling Walmart Home Office. How may I assist you?

 

Keiran:

Hi, I'd like to order a Walmart for my town.

 

Female 2:

... You want to order a Walmart? (incredulous laughter)

 

Keiran:

Yeah, we want a Walmart ...

 

Female 2:

Or you want to suggest a Walmart in your store? I mean in your town?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, we want a Walmart in our town. We have to travel bout two hours to get to one.

 

Female 2:

I understand what you're saying here. What city and state do you live in?

 

Keiran:

We're in an English state in Quebec in Canada.

 

Female 2:

Okay. Let me get you over to our Canadian ... our Canadian office. Just one moment please.

 

Keiran:

All right, thank you.

 

Female 2:

All right, just one second. Let me get that number for you. Their number is 905-821-2111.

 

Keiran:

905-821-2111.

 

Female 2:

Right.

 

Keiran:

All right. Thank you.

 

Female 2:

You have a good day, and thank you for calling.

 

Keiran:

You too.

 

Female 2:

Bye bye.

 

Keiran:

(laughs)

 

 

All right, I'm going to call this other number and see if I can get them to give me a Walmart in my fictional town, which I'm going to call Keiran's Vill, obviously. Here we go. This is so stupid. (laughs)

 

Female 3:

[inaudible 00:05:45] How can I help you?

 

Keiran:

Hi, I'd like to order a Walmart.

 

Female 3:

.. You'd like to order a what, sorry?

 

Keiran:

A Walmart.

 

Female 3:

... I'm not. ... You want to order a Walmart?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, we want a Walmart in our town.

 

Female 3:

One moment please. I'll put you through to the right department.

 

 

(waiting music plays)

 

Keiran:

(laughs) Oh my god this is too much fun.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Automated 2:

Thank you for calling Walmart Canada. [French 00:06:19]

 

Keiran:

All right, come on.

 

Automated 2:

For online shopping, press 1. For store information and inquiries, press 2. To repeat the menu options, press 9. ... Sorry. We did not receive your selection. Please try again.

 

Keiran:

Okay. These calls aren't going well. I just keep getting put on hold a lot. So I'm just going to call Gabriel now and fuck around with him with the Arnold switchboard. And then I'm going to try to call these numbers again later, and avoid all those wait times so you guys don't have to listen to the waiting music. Here we go. Here's dumb ass Gabriel's number. Let's see what fun we can have with him.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Gabriel:

Hello?

 

Keiran:

(in Arnold Schwarzenegger soundboard voice) Howdy, stranger. (laughs)

 

Gabriel:

Hello?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) How are you?

 

Gabriel:

I'm good. [inaudible 00:07:32] What am I, I'm Gabriel. Who's this?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) First, I would like to just get to know you.

 

Gabriel:

... [inaudible 00:07:42]

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) What do you expect?

 

Gabriel:

(laughs) [crosstalk 00:07:50] Who are you?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Arnold Schwarzenegger. This is me, Arnold Schwarzenegger. How are you?

 

Gabriel:

Oh. (laughs) Really?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) You son of a bitch.

 

Gabriel:

(laughs) Am I?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Fuck you.

 

Gabriel:

Fuck me?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Fuck you.

 

Gabriel:

Fuck me?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Stop whining!

 

Gabriel:

Okay, I'm sorry.

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Bitch!

 

Gabriel:

(laughs) Why am I a bitch?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) You son of a bitch! Come on, don't bullshit me.

 

Gabriel:

Do the one where he's like, "I'm going to jam my fist into your stomach."

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) You lie! You shut up! ... Now I'm going to ask you ...

 

Gabriel:

Who is this?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) ... a bunch of questions. I want to have them answered immediately.

 

Gabriel:

(laughs) ... Okay.

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) What do you want? ... What do you want?

 

Gabriel:

Hello?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) What do you want?

 

Gabriel:

Why'd you call me, man?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Get your mother, please.

 

Gabriel:

My mom?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Get your mother, please.

 

Gabriel:

(laughs)

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Let me talk to your mother.

 

Gabriel:

(laughs) Yeah? She didn't even know me.

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) I'm Detective John Kimble. Let me talk to your mother.

 

Gabriel:

[inaudible 00:09:20]

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Stop it! Good bye.

 

Gabriel:

Bye ...

 

Keiran:

(laughs) All right, he caught on after a while that I was using the switchboard. But it was still fun. I'll call my mom. My mom won't catch on. She's not as clever as Gabriel is. Hold on. Give me a second to get her number on the line. [inaudible 00:09:44] and we'll give her a call.

 

 

All right, I had no luck with my mom, or my mom's trainer, so I cut that out of the podcast. So I'm going to call my sister now. And after that I'm going to try calling a few switchboard operators, and if it doesn't work I guess I'm just going to give up now. Because I've got a language exchange set. Actually it started 25 minutes ago. The guy's just late, and he just sent me a message. So I'm going to let him wait a few more minutes because he made me wait. And we're going to wrap this up. So let's give these two people another try. Here we go.

 

 

Okay. I'm going to try calling my sister. Because my mom's not working and the other people didn't really work, so why not try this, right? Here we go. This is my middle sister. See if we can get a little fun out of her.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Sister:

Hello?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Howdy, stranger.

 

Sister:

Hello?

 

Keiran:

(Schwarzenegger) Hello, cutie pie.

 

Sister:

... (hangs up)

 

Keiran:

(laughs) Oh man. I'm not having any success with these Arnold Schwarzenegger switchboard prank calls. Only Gabriel's silly enough to go along with it, I guess.

 

 

All right, this has been largely unsuccessful. I'm going to try calling one more number. We've got Coca Cola here. I'll try calling them. Maybe they'll be friendlier than the rest. So here we go. 1 ... 704 there's the number ... 4000 ... 1704 no, 170455744400 yeah. Yeah okay. I'm calling their number now. Let's do it. Here we go.

 

 

(telephone rings)

 

Female 4:

Afternoon. Coca Cola.

 

Keiran:

Hi, how's it going?

 

Female 4:

It's going good. How'd it going with you?

 

Keiran:

I'm pretty good. Ready to go home. The day is almost over.

 

Female 4:

Yes, almost over.

 

Keiran:

All right. What are you doing when you get home?

 

Female 4:

I don't know yet. I haven't decided. But I'm going to get my hair did, for one thing.

 

Keiran:

Nice. Is that a special occasion for you, or you do it regularly?

 

Female 4:

No, I just do it every Wednesday.

 

Keiran:

Oh, every Wednesday? Wow. So that's pretty regular.

 

Female 4:

Yeah, that's regular.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I cut my hair once a year.

 

Female 4:

(laughs) Well your hair must be real, real long.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it starts out short and at the end of the year it kind of turns into an afro and then I got to cut it off.

 

Female 4:

Okay.

 

Keiran:

So does that break the bank, going to do your hair once a week?

 

Female 4:

No, no, not really. You have to budget and know when to do and when not to do. What not to do. Know what to do and what not to do.

 

Keiran:

(laughs) Right right right. Great. So do you do the same thing every week? Or do you get something special done?

 

Female 4:

No, same thing.

 

Keiran:

All right. Wow. I don't think I could survive if I had to do my hair every week. That would stress me out a lot.

 

Female 4:

Oh, well ... To each his own, I guess. (laughs)

 

Keiran:

Okay. I actually ...

 

Female 4:

How may I help you?

 

Keiran:

I actually just forgot why I called, in all honesty. (laughs)

 

Female 4:

Well. You want to call me back when you find out what you want or what you need?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, maybe I'll do that. But if I don't figure it out, you have good luck with your haircut.

 

Female 4:

Okay. All right. Well thank you so much.

 

Keiran:

All right. Have a good one.

 

Female 4:

You too.

 

Keiran:

Bye bye.

 

 

All right. That was fun. She was a fun woman. I hope she gets a good haircut in the future. ...

 

 

All right. So that woman was very pleasant and very nice, and was just a delight to talk to. So I guess not all switchboard operators are unhappy people. I guess I made a huge mistake with that idea I had at the beginning of the podcast.

 

 

Okay, guys, I hope you found that useful. There was actually a good idiom in there when I was talking to this woman just moments ago. It was: Are you going to break the bank? By going to the hair salon every week. Are you going to break the bank? Meaning: Are you going to spend a lot of money doing that? My haircut would cost about 15 or 20 dollars if I went. But when my wife goes, she spends up to 170, 180 bucks. So for this woman to go every week, I assume she's spending quite a decent amount of money. But I guess that depends what kind of hairdresser you're going to.

Nov 1, 2016

Today on Uncensored English Gabe tells us about his embarrasingly stupid halloween adventure. 

 

*** Transcript***

 

Keiran:

All right. What’s up Gabriel? It's good to have you back on the podcast.

 

Gabriel:

Hey.

 

Keiran:

How's it going man?

 

Gabriel:

Good to be back. A lot of things, a lot of life-changing moments in my life and I am living it very well.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. What are these big moments you're talking about?

 

Gabriel:

These are personal things. These are very, very personal. I'm recently a man of faith.

 

Keiran:

You're recently a what?

 

Gabriel:

A man of faith.

 

Keiran:

A man of faith, really? What happened?

 

Gabriel:

Well, I had a long conversation with a fellow comedian about Christianity and he convinced me that the way I was living my life was completely wrong and so now, I'm a man of faith.

 

Keiran:

All right and what did he tell you? What's this bullshit story you're telling me?

 

Gabriel:

Well, he saw me. He constantly run into me on my way as I was going out, doing the [Boettcherist 00:01:09] terrible things like meeting up with really sexy ladies. He said he was able to smell the HPV on me and because of that-

 

Keiran:

Does HPV have a scent?

 

Gabriel:

According to [he 00:01:24], to him it does. I was like, "By goodness gracious, you're right," and I went to ... I bought a cross.

 

Keiran:

Wait. This is stupid. I remember you telling me you went to like Greek-

 

Gabriel:

Oh, yeah.

 

Keiran:

Like some Greek Catholic holiday. When was that? Was that in the summer? What was that thing you went to, like the Greek church?

 

Gabriel:

Oh, was it Easter?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, you went to Greek Easter.

 

Gabriel:

Well, okay. When I was a kid-

 

Keiran:

[crosstalk 00:01:59] your stories is a bunch of bullshit.

 

Gabriel:

No, okay.

 

Keiran:

Because really you already are religious to some extent.

 

Gabriel:

No, no. What happened was, I was baptized Roman Catholic and then when I was 16 years old, my mother baptized me behind my dad’s back, Greek orthodox, and now I rebaptized myself Catholic.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so you’ve been baptized three times basically?

 

Gabriel:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Basically you've been dunked in stinky water three times.

 

Gabriel:

No, they just put a little bit of water on your forehead.

 

Keiran:

All right. Well, congratulations for that, I guess.

 

Gabriel:

May the Lord be with you too.

 

Keiran:

All right, so since you've had this stupid change in your life, what have you been doing now on the weekend, man?

 

Gabriel:

Oh, man. I got fucked up and what did I do. Okay, this Halloween I dressed up as ... Oh, I bought a beekeepers outfit.

 

Keiran:

A beekeepers, like you bought a real one or that you bought from a costume store?

 

Gabriel:

It was a costume. It was a costume.

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Gabriel:

It covers my entire body from head to toe and you can’t see my face.

 

Keiran:

That's not creepy or anything.

 

Gabriel:

It's amazing to walk around and everyone's like, "Yeah. Beekeeper." Then on my chest, there's a little name tag that just says, "Beekeeper," but then I took a sharpie and cut out like the B to make it look like a P so it just says, "P keeper." Everybody hates it. Everybody's disgusted by it.

 

Keiran:

Well, technically everyone's a P keeper [crosstalk 00:03:44]-

 

Gabriel:

I know. The best was I had to work with it all day Saturday and I was bringing food to people in my beekeeper outfit. They see the P and they're like, they're not impressed, like everyone’s rolling their eyes. They're like, "Oh, you [inaudible 00:04:02]."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it's kind of lowbrow humor, I guess.

 

Gabriel:

Oh, it's so stupid.

 

Keiran:

I don't know. I think that was a pretty funny idea.

 

Gabriel:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so that was your Halloween, you just went as a beekeeper at [McGibbons 00:04:15] or you didn't do anything else?

 

Gabriel:

No, I met up with other comedians, like good friends of mine. They're great, I love them.

 

Keiran:

Okay, and what did you guys do?

 

Gabriel:

Well, first we were drinking at one of my friend's, Dylan’s, place, our friend and we drank and drank and drank. Then I invited my girlfriend, Bart Simpson, and she came over.

 

Keiran:

That was her costume or that's her pretend stupid name you're giving her so she can retain her anonymity through this story.

 

Gabriel:

No, that’s her nickname because I was seeing her for like two months and then when I was going to invite her, I realized that I didn’t actually know her name.

 

Keiran:

Really?

 

Gabriel:

I didn’t know if it was either Cassandra or the Cassidy. I was like, "Fuck." I was talking to whatever Jason, and Jason’s like, "What do you call her?" I'm like, "I just call her Bart."

 

Keiran:

That's kind of weird especially if you're using that name during sex.

 

Gabriel:

I don't know if I'm fucking her I'm like, "Yeah, Bart. Suck my dick, Bart."

 

Keiran:

All right, so what happened with Bart and the gang of comics?

 

Gabriel:

They came in and then like Dylan's like, "Hey, I'm Dylan," and she's like, "Hi, I'm Cassidy." I'm like, "All right. That’s cool." She was dressed like a hippie. [Thanos 00:05:34] was dressed like a mechanic. Jason was dressed as a butcher, [Omer 00:05:39] was dressed as a spooky Mario and Dylan was dressed as like a sexy like Batman with like an open shirt, you know?

 

Keiran:

That's terrible.

 

Gabriel:

We went to a house party that sucked but we got really drunk. Then we went to like the bar I work at. It was crazy there. Everyone was going crazy, everyone was going wild. Oh, yeah and like the girl I was with was forcing me ... Not forcing me, like trying to convince us all to do gay stuff, like kiss each other-

 

Keiran:

Kiss the other guy comics that were there.

 

Gabriel:

Yeah, kiss each other and then Thanos was like, "Come on man. It'll be funny." I'm like, "I don’t know. I don’t know if I want to do that," and then like my buddy Omer kissed him and then he opened his mouth a bit with a little bit of tongue and fucking Thanos almost threw up. He's like, "Oh, my God. Y'all gave me head and think I..." Then whenever Thanos grabbed me and fucking literally force kissed me on the lips. I was like, "Ah, man." It was weird. Then left the girls all happy.

 

Keiran:

Why would that make her happy?

 

Gabriel:

I think she just liked the power or something, I don't know.

 

Keiran:

Gross.

 

Gabriel:

Then we were going around and we saw some other friends-

 

Keiran:

I think I lost respect for all of you just now.

 

Gabriel:

No, come on man. We're cool.

 

Keiran:

No, from now on I’m not giving any of you guys any respect in public. That was just such a bad decision. If you guys were gay then fine, but I mean ... All right, anyways. Keep going.

 

Gabriel:

Well, yeah. We love each other. Anyway, then we were at the ... We saw some other friends and me and Bart Simpson, we saw like ... She was trying to convince those people to kiss each other and then they're like, "If we make out, can I fuck around with you?" I'm like, "All right, we've got to go." Then, oh I don't remember what the fuck else happened. Oh, we had like car bombs which was like we'd take a half pint of Guinness beer and drop a shot of Jameson whiskey in it and drink it.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's a car bomb.

 

Gabriel:

We had that. It was good.

 

Keiran:

What's the stupidest Halloween costume you've ever had and what's the best Halloween costume you've ever had, besides a beekeeper?

 

Gabriel:

Last year when I was the Wolfman because I have a beard and I have like a jean jacket and then like every place we'd go to had a coat check but I'd be like, "Nah, it's part of my costume." They're like, "Oh, okay," so they let me get in places with my coat. I guess that's a smart costume. Stupid costume, I went as Dr. Oz one year, that was funny. Then another year I went as-

 

Keiran:

Wait. Who's Dr. Oz?

 

Gabriel:

He's the guy that's on daytime TV in North America where he talks about like women’s issues but more like biological women's issues.

 

Keiran:

Oh, okay. He's some kind of fake Dr. TV-

 

Gabriel:

He's a real surgeon, but he went onto TV and then he added, Oprah made him famous and then just him talking to women about how to avoid getting constipated or whatever. "If you need to take a shit, you've got to eat fiber." Everyone's like, "Oh."

 

Keiran:

That's just basic information, man. That's just like drink water and eat fiber and then you'll have-

 

Gabriel:

Yeah, but these dumb brawds over in ... No, anyway.

 

Keiran:

All right. I'm going to post this in the Montreal comedy community.

 

Gabriel:

You know what? I don't even care anymore. I couldn't give a shit.

 

Keiran:

All right. No, no. It's fine. They're done with they don't know how to eat a proper diet. That’s pretty basic information.

 

Gabriel:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

All right. I think, one time I went out as like a 80s porn star.

 

Gabriel:

That's cool.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it was a pretty good costume. I had like a Speedo and then a really tacky red ... You know those windbreaker jackets?

 

Gabriel:

Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

 

Keiran:

Then I had a really stupid mustache and shades but then I went out with another friend and he just one upped me. He just had the same costume but he didn't bring a jacket. He was just in a Speedo and he got an award for like the best costume or something. I was just like, "Man, you just stole my idea."

 

Gabriel:

Yeah, fuck that. Then, fuck, everyone sees a Speedo and they're like, "Uck."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I was in a Speedo dude.

 

Gabriel:

Yeah, I know but like just a Speedo? It's fucked up.

 

Keiran:

No, a Speedo and a jacket. It's an embarrassing costume. That's ... Yeah, why did I wear that? Ah, dude.

 

Gabriel:

You were able to hear that?

 

Keiran:

Really man?

 

Gabriel:

I didn't know. Okay.

 

Keiran:

That's, I think ... Oh, God. This is degrading into a terrible [crosstalk 00:10:33].

 

Gabriel:

No, it's good.

 

Keiran:

All right man. I think that's enough of a random small talk, pretty-

 

Gabriel:

You think?

 

Keiran:

This has been ten minutes. All right, do you have anything you want to say to the people out there before we end this train wreck of a podcast?

 

Gabriel:

Listen to your mom. Listen to your mom’s, listen to your dad’s, read your Bible every evening, pray three times a day.

 

Keiran:

What about if your dad baptizes you in one church and your mom baptizes you in another church?

 

Gabriel:

Oh, they're good people. They want to help. Oh, yeah. I haven't got any emails from you fucking people there. I said last time I was on I wanted to get emails from you people so I could read them on the air. I didn't get any, so please send me a god damn email.

 

Keiran:

All right, what's your email address?

 

Gabriel:

Gabomassi@gmail.com. Send me one. Send me some tit pics, some dick pics. I don't care man. I want to just get an email from a stranger and I’ll send you an email back. I’ll send you a photograph, a letter, autograph rather.

 

Keiran:

All right, you can send Gab your most terrible, awful English-language questions and he'll answer them.

 

Gabriel:

Yeah and then I’ll really-

 

Keiran:

Don't feel like you need to send him a picture unless you really [crosstalk 00:11:57] something.

 

Gabriel:

Send me, if you have questions about problems or you need like advice or personal, or like medical advice or stuff like that, send me something man.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, you can ask Gabriel who spent the last weekend kissing boys at a bar.

 

Gabriel:

I know a lot about that.

 

Keiran:

All right, man. Thanks for going on the podcast and we'll catch you guys on the next episode of Uncensored English.

 

Oct 30, 2016

Today's podcast is delayed until tomorrow, it's ready I just ran out of bandwith to upload it! Check back tomorrow to listen to Gabriel talk about his stupid drunken Halloween adventure.

Oct 29, 2016

In this episodes podcast we talk about the express "to knock one back", Halloween, my incredibly shitty Thursday and lastly language partners.

Oct 27, 2016

Are you a chicken or do you eat chicken, hopefully it's the latter, or maybe neither if you're a vegetarian/ vegan. Today we talk about chickening out and some similar expressions.

 

*** Transcript***

 

Keiran: Hey, there how is it going guys. Today is Tuesday October the 25th and one of my students just bailed on me. And so I'm gonna record this podcast right now for tomorrow. Hope you're doing well, I'm doing pretty well and today I wanted to talk about chickening out or being a chicken. And a few other words we used to talk about when someone doesn't have the courage to do something which is what we call chickening out. But before I get into that I just want to leave a few thoughts for you to consider. I know some of you guys out there have been using the transcripts for the podcasts, you find it useful to be able to read what I am saying or what any other guests are saying, while we're doing the podcast.

 

And I started to get a company to write them for me in September and when we did the first one I read it and it was very well done. However just yesterday I checked the transcript they provided for Monday's podcast and it was fuckin' awful. There was even one point in the transcript where what I had said was -- had been marked down as David Peachy saying and David Peachy was saying what I had said. And there's tons of words missing and I spent about 45 minutes correcting it. So if you guys are ever reading these transcripts and you see a lot of mistakes, please, please, please let me know because I get this done for you and if they're doing a poor job at it, I have to go after them.

 

And they're either gonna shape up or I'm gonna find someone else to do it because this is an English language podcast they can't have tons of mistakes everywhere, right? Alright so that's it about that. Another thing I want to just mention before we get on with chickening out and wussing out and wimping out which we'll get to very shortly is we got podcast number 100 coming up on Saturday. So if you haven't voted on what you want me to do, I would do it quickly. I suggested either I'd drunk dial some of the podcast listeners which means you're gonna have to give me your numbers or I will prank call some of the old podcast guests or lastly I'm gonna call up switchboard operators which are the people who connect you to people of importance inside some major Fortune 500 companies.

 

So let me know what you wanna do inside the private Facebook group and we will do that and let's get on with the show. So in life we always find ourselves in -- I guess you can say sometimes you stagnate. You feel you're not growing anymore and at the back of your head  usually you know what you need to do to move forward. Usually, not always. And a lot of the times what you need to do to move forward is something that is quite uncomfortable. Maybe you have to try to get a foreign client for the first time; maybe you have to present in a foreign language; maybe you have to apply to a new job but you don't do it. You chicken out. You sit there and you wait and you wait and you wait and by chickening out, we mean you lack courage in that moment.

 

I think everyone has had this experience sometime in their life. I remember the first time that I chickened out was - we used to go to the water slides when we were younger. We would go to the pool that we belonged to and it was all the older kids and we would go with the lifeguards which was so much fun because we kind of looked up to them and they were -- they're like our role models or our friends/teachers at the same time. And at the water slides we always went to there's this huge water slide, which was just a very steep slide, it went almost straight down. And this was kind of like the cool kid water slide, you know like the one you bragged about going on because it was so scary. And I remember the first three times we went there, I went with my friends and then you walked up this huge tower, all these stairs as we get to the top.

 

And then I just stood there, and I just saw people going down and I completely chickened out. There's no way I was gonna do that. It was way too scary for me, right? Now chickening out is a general word, you can use it for anyone and the other word we often hear is wussing out, wussing out. That comes from the word or the noun wuss. And a wuss is kind of like a mean word we use to describe a man or a boy who has no courage. So that's a bit of a gendered word. It's oriented more towards men. So in that scenario, I could say I wussed out. I could say, I wasn't as masculine as I could have been in that moment. And then the other one we also use is wimp out. Actually no, sorry not wimp out. Pussy out. He pussied out of it.

 

This one is a very sensitive word too and you might get in trouble for using it in North America at the moment because, I mean pussy has a lot of different meanings associated with it. One of them is a pussy cat, a small kitten. Second one could be, it's a vulgar word for the word, vagina. So when you say pussy out of something, it means we're kind of mocking women in a sense. We're saying, oh women are not strong and you're acting like a woman, so you pussied out. So we don't really use this one that often unless you're with a group of guys and they're making fun of each other. So I would go with chicken out if you ever wanna use a different way of saying I'm scared of doing something. You say, "I chickened out of it".

 

So what have you chickened out of, think of that. Maybe you can even put it in the comments below. And maybe you don't want to but hey why not, it's fun too have little courage and you know be open and be honest, make yourself vulnerable, that's always an uncomfortable thing to do but at the end of the day if you respect yourself, isn't that all that matters? So I'm curious what did you ever chicken out of. Actually I haven't really chickened out of very much recently. The last year I think I've done all the things I wanted to do. I started a podcast. I started my own comedy show. I'm building the website and I'm gonna be continuing to do that. 

 

I have a few audio books or programs that I'm actually in the beginning stages of making which I think are gonna be exciting to any language learner out there who is sick of all the routine stuff that they're constantly being tried to baaah! my language is falling apart. You know you're sick of all the normal language learning products out there. I think mine is gonna be more fun because I'm more fun than them, they're boring. They're very boring so why would you wanna buy a boring product, right? I'm not gonna talk about that anymore. 

 

So guys that's about it for today. We talked about chickening out, wussing out, pussying out of something. And I want you guys to think about that for a moment. What have you ever chickened out of, what have you've ever wussed out of, or what have you ever pussied out of? And let us know, you know. Participate, grow your language, listen to this a few times, make sure you understand the podcast fully. Take notes if there's any other expressions in there that you liked. And we'll catch you next time on the next podcast of UnCensored English. 

 

 

 

Oct 24, 2016

By request of a listener this podcast is about nothing at all.... that's right David Peachey and I shoot the shit about whatever pops into our minds. 

***Transcript***

Keiran: All right, what’s up everybody, today on the Podcast we have David Peachey back on here. How it’s going David?

 

David: I am back, yes good to be back here Keiran. How things going over there?

 

Keiran: Pretty good, I have started doing French lessons on Italki.

 

David: Really, so what is the kind of level of the French would be there?

 

Keiran: I would say probably an intermediate, may be a low intermediate level. I can hold the conversation but there is a lot of words that escape me. If I am listening to radio or a Podcast, I really have to struggle and listen and focus, re-listen and re-listen. Yeah, so I'd say intermediate. What about you, have you spend any time learning languages recently?

 

David: Uhhh, yes I have, I just been learning some Russian songs. From my time in Russia, I've kept one of my teachers and I am learning Russian songs with her, which is quite interesting. Its from an old Russian movies.

 

Keiran: Oh cool! That is very interesting. How long you have been doing Russian for, how long you have been learning that?

 

David: Good question. I guess I have been learning for about two years now, close to two years. I started off with the basic phrases, basic dialogues. I used a couple of very very helpful Russian teachers. They are wonderful. And One of them offered Russian through songs. So I thought, I will pick this up and we're working on classic songs from movies, a couple of children songs.

 

Keiran: Okay great. I love children's songs for learning, even children's television. I think a lot of people will overlook it and it is generally the language structure in children...Anything for children is very simple and there is a lot of repetition and it is an easy and fun way to learn.

 

David: Yeah, I find  listening to children like native speakers, they are quite easy to follow.

 

Keiran: Yeah for sure, right. I am curious, so you have been doing Russian for two years. How it is going like, what do you think is your level right now?

 

David:Uh I think my level is probably still pre-intermediate. The reasoning behind doing the songs is, not so much for vocabulary or grammar but to focus on pronunciation. Which I have been tormenting me for a long time because I was trying to pronounce every syllable and Russian tends to neutralize vowels as well.

 

Keiran: Okay, so you are singing and recording yourself?

 

David: Yes, actually just tonight I've come back from a open mic nights. And they uh, the organizers requested one of the Russian songs which I have sung a couple of times before.

 

Keiran: That is awesome, how did it go?

 

David: Yeah, they love it. It um it's  a poker style songs. Even though they don’t understand the words...I'll introduce it in Russia and I'll say Bolshoe Spasibo at the end. But the organizer just this evening said, "I love that song, it makes me want to pick up a bottle of Vodka."

 

Keiran: [laughing] That's funny. It is really interesting now, I was doing on Quebec for greater part of my life. Quebec is weird in that language, there is a lot of tension with language because English people have to learn French. And whenever something is forced on you, you obviously don’t enjoy it.

 

David: Yeah, you rebel a bit, yup.

 

Keiran: Right. And I always had issues with France. Like I'd always resented French class. I'm was like, "No, not French, I hate French." And was this thing that cause me pain. I was always poor in it. And then it's weird that, once I actively made this choice of start learning French, because I wanted to. I want perform in comedy in the upcoming summer in the French comedy scene.

 

David: Oh nice, great.

 

Keiran: But since I started doing it, like these interactions which used to be kind of painful for me. Like going to the store to buy something and the clerk is French. Is now the most pleasant experience and like I really feel in the moment. It is crazy how just embracing a language can. I don’t know, it seems to brighten up my day in ways that never happened before, you know.

 

David: Right and it's just like to you now is just a simple interaction, you breeze through it.

 

Keiran: Well its not simple.

 

David: Ok


Keiran: Like f
or example, l lost my wallet about two weeks ago, which is the biggest piss off, to lose your wallet you know.

 

David: Oh I can imagine, yeah.

 

Keiran: You get all your IDs in there and then you got ran around area and replace them all. But one think I had was a point's card for the alcohol store I go to. 


David: Okay.


Kerian: So after I lost the wallet, I went back to that store and I had to tell them about this so I can get a new points card. And I did it in French and it was really fun. But then I got to a point in the interaction where I didn’t know what the wallet was. 


David: Oh okay.


Kerian: So I'm like [foreign words] And I asked her, "Like what is this?" And she like, [foreign words] Which is literally, holding paper.

 

David: Like portfolio in English or….?

 

Kerian: Right, exactly. So itt's just like...its weird how the whole world can become like a lesson if you have the right mentality. And I had the wrong mentality for 32 years, because I never wanted to learn French before. Now its just everything positive. It is weird.

 

David: Yeah, definitely making the active decision is a big step forward, right?


Keiran: Yeah. How about you, do you get opportunities, is there any area in Brisbane where you can go and meet Russian people and practice your Russian and try to spark up a conversation?


David: Uh funny you should ask. Yeah we do have a few communities here in Brisbane. A few weeks ago we had the Ukrainian festival. 


Keiran: Okay, cool.


David: Uh, Ukrainians would of course speak Ukrainian but there is a fair amount of Russian speakers and out of that festival and it was a small affair. But they served Ukrainian beer and they served Ukrainian food. And they had Ukrainian pop singer who is now living in Brisbane. But I could have a few conversation in Russian which was quite pleasant and Ukrainians were really quite surprised. Pleasantly surprised to hear me mangle their language.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Or may be mangle Russia’s language. Maybe is that. 


Keiran: But is amazing how people really appreciate when you attempt to use their language and I think...Unfortunately the only language which probably don’t do this is English because everyone...Like it's a universal language I think, but do you know what I mean by that?

 

David: Yeah, it is expected that if you don’t speak, someone doesn’t speak your first language or he must know a little bit of English.


Keiran: Right. Well I mean like when I was in Korea for example, this never really happened to me but I always remember other English teachers complaining about it. But when you are out in the city people would come up to you and try to talk to you because they want to practice their English.

 

David: Oh yes, that happens a few times as well.

 

Keiran: The English teachers will after while would get fed up about this. But if I go up to a person in Quebec and attempt to speak French with them. Like generally they are super happy about it. They're saying, "Oh! this person is making an effort to learn the language."

 

David: Um-hmm definitely, that is so important.

 

Keiran: Right but in English, people are just like, "No, no, I am not your teacher. Like you go watch TV or you get a book."

 

David: Yeah, go to YouTube or something. That's a bit unfortunate, isn’t it?


Keiran: Yeah, I think it is, but I mean I still recommend to my students. If you are walking around and your part of town and you see a English person. I am just like you just try. Worst they can say is like, "I am not interested or leave me alone."

 

David: Yeah, you don’t need to have an extended conversation about Shakespeare or anything. It can just be a little bit of banter, little bit of small talk, how is the weather, how is the day going. I mean that is really what we have as native speakers. Little bit of chats, that is it.

 

Keiran: Yeah, a just a little small talk, right?

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: David, recently it was my birthday and I'm curious, what is...

 

David: Happy Birthday.

 

Keiran: Thank you. Thank you What are the birthday traditions that you guys do in your family or in Australia the common ones?

 

David: Birthday traditions. This is a good question. It's not so much focused on the day... We would well in my family we would at least arrange some kind of family lunch or family dinner. And it is just a chance to catch up for everyone. Because I and my brothers, the three of us are grown up, and we've all left home. So it's always nice to catch up with parents again.

 

Keiran: Okay. This is like, you guys do this for every birthday or like all your brothers birthdays, your mom’s birthday, your father’s birthday, you always have a family dinner.

 

David: Yeah, we would arrange it and probably not even on the day. Just around the weekend or even within two weeks of it happening. We wouldn’t even really bother with presents, I think.

 

Keiran: Oh, that's great. I wish my family did that, I hate presents.

 

David: Yeah, that is an obligation, isn’t there?

 

Keiran: Yeah, exactly. It is like oh, last week it was my birthday and actually I have succeeded. It is taking a me several years of arguing with my family. I got no presents this, I got two presents and I am just like, "Yes, now don’t have to buy them presents." [laughing]

 

David: So the obligation in return, they bought you a present and you have to buy them a present in return. Yeah I see, I see.

 

Keiran: I mean there's that aspect of, you get a present but you have to buy presents for like 12 other birthdays during the year. Then there is other aspect of, I just don’t really need anything physical anymore you know. I have…Maybe I am not a materialistic person but I have I think, what I need and I don’t want people to be like, "Here now you have this."

 

David: Something extra and you think, "Well, thank you but what do I do with it?"

 

Keiran: Yeah, exactly right. Its kind of like a burden that you get on your birthday.

 

David: Have you ever re-gifted something? 


Keiran: Re-gifted. Have I re-gifted someone, that's a good question.


David: Given the present to somebody else and say,"Hey, look at what I have got for you?"

 

Keiran: I don’t think I have re-gifted anything to be honest. Have you re-gifted anything?

 

David: I am just trying to think about it. Um what was it? There was something I gave as a gift recently and...tt escapes my mind but I recall it being a present from a year or two years ago I just never used it. So I think I wrapped up again and...because it was in perfect condition. Never used it. I gave it to someone else as a gift. I think it was friend and it wasn’t someone in my family.

 

Keiran: No, I don’t think I have re-gifted some thing. But you know what we do...This weird thing we do in my families, that we always keep the gift bags.


David: Oh yeah.


Keiran: From my Christmas and birthdays, and whatever. Then every once in a while like, a year later. It's this comical thing where you give someone a gift but it's in the same bag they used to give you the gift. Then sometimes you still have like the little name tag on it. 


David: Oops.


Keiran: Yeah it's like oops. I guess that's...It's recycling, it's good. It just looks bad if you give it to someone who is outside of your family. [laughing]

 

David: It is good to save the wrapping paper and the gift bags because it makes look like, you have tried to make an effort even though you have just saved paper and recycled it .

 

Keiran: Right. You know I just realized about birthdays is that...You said you guys have a family dinner. 


David: Yeah.


Keiran: We have the family dinner too but I've hated the family dinner because in my family, the family dinner, it's like a tradition that we did it every night, growing up. Every night we have a family dinner, the whole family sits together. And then when we all moved out, it was kind of nice because you haven’t seen each other for a while, right? But now I'm living in Montreal again, they're common...The family dinner to me is not only about family, as it is about my mom getting to be with her kids and bombard with questions. 


David: Oh yeah.


Keiran: And I am like ah! Even on my birthday she is like, "When are we going to have your birthday?" And I'm like, "Well it is my birthday, so I don’t really want to do that." Then my dad gets mad. He's like, "Keiran, make your mother happy." I am like,"No." [laughing] "It is my birthday. I know what this is." This is just her going to be like, "Do you like your presents, do you like your dinner?” I am just like, "Ah! No I don’t like this, leave me. Let me get out of this terrible family dinner."

 

David: Whose birthday say it again, yeah?

 

Keiran: Have you ever had like a painful family dinner? Did you ever have the ones? Like they felt forced or was it more enjoyable?

 

David: I am guessing probably when I was much younger and we'ed all just left home. And this is where we really wanted to have independence and we wanted to indulge in it. Yeah, I guess the family dinners back then felt to be more forced. I definitely recall we were very slack about being ready or coming to the right place at the right house, or coming to the right restaurant from time. We would typically turn up late. Which is a habit I've since stopped.

 

Keiran: ok

David: At the moment, time has passed and I think we are bit more comfortable and we can take these families dinners in our strides. So we are little more relaxed about them.

 

Keiran: That is great, it's great that your family has adapted with times, unlike my family, or at least my mom. Well David, thanks for coming on here. This is been a very a loose Podcast we did for you guys, we didn’t really chose the topic or not here.


David: No thanks.


Keiran: We just planned to have some small talk. Thanks again for helping us out with the Podcast David.

 

David: Okay, thanks again for having me Keiran. I am looking forward to the next time.

 

Keiran: All right, Great. We will catch you guys on the next Podcast of Unnnnnnncensored English.

 

Oct 21, 2016

You are so smart for reading this comment, you're such a clever cat, you can do anything you want... no really.. you could probably even butter people up.

 

Oct 19, 2016

Bugger! Clacker! Struick! Don't know what those mean? Better listen!

 

***Transcript*** 

Keiran: Alright. Today, we have David Peachey back on the podcast. How's it going, David?

 

David: Hurrah! It's going pretty well over here down here. Yup.

 

Keiran: And what’s new with you lately?

 

David: A few things. In general, I’m planning a holiday that’s coming up soon. Just giving myself a break and apart from that, yeah, I’m going through the motions of the teaching and a bit of socializing, a bit of music. It’s really quite nice.

 

Keiran: Ah , cool. So, where’s the holiday you’re planning. Where are you going to go?

 

David: Okay. I’m off to Hong Kong simply out of curiosity. I’ve never been there before. I don’t consider myself a big city person, but yeah, I’ll try it out anyway to see what it looks like.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Scoot around.

 

Keiran: That’s exciting and when are you heading out there?

 

David: Next month, so, yeah, mid-November. So, basically, my plan is go to Hong Kong, zip across to Macau because apparently it’s close. They’ve got the Grand Prix on around mid-November, so…

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: Prices for hotels and even hostels have just sky rocketed into the hundreds literally.

 

Keiran: Yeah. It’s a good to juice everyone when that’s happening.

 

David: Yeah. So, and yeah, then I’ll catch a couple of friends down in Malaysia and then checkout Myanmar, the old Burma.

 

Keiran: Alright. Cool man. Well, I hope that trip goes well.

 

David: Yeah. Looking forward to it. Yeah.

 

Keiran: So, David, today on the podcast, you’re going to be teaching us about some local slang. I’m only familiar with one of the words that you…

 

David: Yes.

 

Keiran: Propose to talk to about today. So, let’s just get started. What…

 

David: Yup. Let’s get into these words.

 

Keiran: What do you have ready for us today?

 

David: Okay. The first word would be the one you’re most familiar with which is…

 

Keiran: Bugger.

 

David: Bugga.

 

Keiran: Bugga.

 

David: Yeah. Bugga and we drop the R at the end like good Australians.

 

Keiran: Yeah. The lazy pronunciation. Bugga.

 

David: Yeah. And it’s a lovely exclamation and we use it all the time to surprise, frustration. You can say, “Bugga me” if you’re very surprised.

 

Keiran: Sorry. Can you explain it a little more, like let’s say I say I bought – like I say, “David, come outside. I have something for you and then you go outside and there’s a brand new car.” Are you going to say, “Oh, bugga me! A new car!”

 

David: I would. Yeah. “Bugger me! A new car!”

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: It’s funny.

 

David: Yeah. I think bugger by itself, it’s maybe a bit more like frustration or annoyance or I didn’t expect this to happen, “Oh! Bugger!”

 

Keiran: Right. You what I think we’ve occasionally heard this – I’ve occasionally heard this word and it was always from an older person in Canada It’s like maybe like my grandma and she would always say, “Oh, you little bugger! Get out of the cookies. Those are for after dinner.”

 

David: That’s the interesting thing because it’s quite a strong word in the UK, so you wouldn’t readily use it or use it as freely as we would.

 

Keiran: Maybe my grandma has a foul mouth.

 

[laughter]

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: I don’t know.

 

David: Possibly or maybe the meaning’s changed that’s why I find this word interesting. So, little bit of history is that bugger means sodomy. Bugger means anal sex.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: That’s the – that’s why it’s such a strong word in British English.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

David: History of that, it comes from and this is going to sound a bit racist, it comes from Bulgarian.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: And apparently, there was some war or bad blood, so…

 

Keiran: And then they’ve…

 

David: Bulgarian, bulgar, became bugger.

 

Keiran: Oh! That’s interesting.

 

David: Yeah. So, that’s the interesting thing.

 

Keiran: I thought you’re going to say that they buggered them after they won the war, like…

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: I forget we’re…

 

David: I had to [inaudible] that much.

 

Keiran: No, but I remember, I remember maybe I’m completely wrong on this, but it was kind of like a form of humiliating the opponents after you win a war, you – anyways, this is getting very graphic.

 

[laughter]

 

David: Yeah. I do. I’m not very good at modern history, so I don’t know.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: I pondered on why it’s much softer outside of the UK and maybe it’s not because we’re desensitized to it or we’re in denial of its history, but there’s an extra theory that’s says bugger comes from a corruption of Irish Gaelic speaking saying, by-god, which would be “begorr” …

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: Which is where we get our stereotypical begorrah from, which no Irish person ever says.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

David: So, it could be a version of “by-gorr” or a combination of the two. So, that’s just a little theory. Maybe that’s why it’s just a casual word here. It’s actually not vulgar at all to us.

 

Keiran: Right. And I don’t remember it being vulgar when I was in Australia when I heard it. I was – it just seemed to be dropped around quite carefree with a…

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: You wouldn’t think about it much.

 

David: Yeah. I do wonder if that’s, yeah, a combination of two different histories taken to the Australian bugger.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

David: Just my history [phonetic].

 

Keiran: Alright. Let’s go onto the next one. What’s the next word you have for us?

 

David: Okay. Going on from bugger, we have the word “clacker” and this is one of my favorite Australian slang words, and it’s connected to bugger because clacker is the anatomical anus.

 

Keiran: The anatomical anus.

 

David: Anus. Yeah. So, it can’t really correlate with asshole because you can’t use clacker to describe a person.

 

Keiran: So, you’re saying you’re not someone’s an asshole, you’re saying – you’re just talking about the anatomical part of the body?

 

David: Yes. So, “A pain in the clacker.” Yeah. “What’s up with your clacker?”

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: This is funny. It is a funny – it’s a funny way to say.

 

David: It’s beautiful word.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Yeah, “You’re clacker!” “Kick up the clacker!”

 

Keiran: Now, is it…

 

David: “You need to kick up the clacker!”

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: Is this is a regional, like, is this is a regional slang in Australia? Is it for like people around Brisbane because I don’t recall hearing this one when I was Wagga. Maybe Wagga wasn’t clacker region.

 

David: It is definitely east coast.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: It’s in a couple of Australian comedies, but yeah, if you – the main point is it is in the anatomical sense of the…

 

Keiran: Right.

 

David: So, it doesn’t really in a figurative sense. Now, my little online research tells me it comes from that which clacks. This makes no sense. We don’t say clack. We mean fart.

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: Well, I mean, I guess maybe it could…

 

David: Logical.

 

[chuckling]

 

Keiran: I guess it depends how you hear it. Like my wife always gets angry when in Canada, we say dogs bark, and she says, “No, they don’t. They go, haw, haw, haw, haw, haw!” And I’m just like, “Okay. Well, maybe that’s Mongolia dogs.”

 

[laughter]

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: Like I don’t here dogs go haw, haw, haw, haw, haw!

 

David: Oh! Haw! Haw! Yeah, that’s sounds pretty common about, yeah, also in Turkish they say haw. Yup. Yeah. So, clacker is – my theory is it actually comes from the Latin word “cloaca” which – you use cloaca to describe – if you’re talking about birds and fish because they don’t have like anything remotely like human genitalia. They just have one hole.

 

Keiran: Right. Yeah.

 

David: Which is the kind of excretion/reproduction…

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Do everything and that’s called the cloaca, so I wonder if that’s been corrupted into the Australian clacker.

 

Keiran: Maybe. That would make sense.

 

David: Maybe.

 

Keiran: One of my other podcasts, so he’s a bird fanatic and he likes to talk about birds do everything through that one hole, so.

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: The words are similar. That could be an easy jump, right?

 

David: Yeah. I think that’s a much easy jump that trying to describe farting as clacking. We just don’t that.

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: Okay. Alright. So, clacker means the anatomical anus.

 

David: Yes.

 

Keiran: It’s interesting. Okay. “So, I got a pain in the clacker.”

 

David: Yup. Or someone needs a “kick up the clacker” or…

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: Okay. That’s a god one. Alright. What’s the next one you have for us, David?

 

David: Okay. Word number three. This is a pretty outdated word. If you use this in Australia, people will think you stepped out of 1940 or 1950. It is “struth.”

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: Which is an expression of surprise. Now, it’s other than S-T-R-U-T-H or S-T-R-E-W-T-H and it comes from 18th century English which is like a contraction of God’s truth.

 

Keiran: What do you mean God’s truth?

 

David: God’s truth. So, it’s like a religious oath. It’s a swearing by God’s truth.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

David: So, you say, “Oh! Struth!” Of course that meaning, that connection is lost in time. Yeah, I found it quite interesting because this goes all the way back to Shakespeare. He had, not sure if he spones, which was God’s bones in Hamlet. Hamlet definitely says splood, God’s blood.

 

Keiran: So, it’s like an abbreviation for God and another word, struth, God’s truth.

 

David: Yup.

 

Keiran: It’s interesting.

 

David: God’s truth, yeah, corrupt or contract into struth.

 

Keiran: So, I guess if you’re in Australia in the near future and you’re going to the retirement home and you find some really old people, you could maybe throw this word around to get in.

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: To get in with the gang of old people. Struth.

 

David: Yeah. It’s very – yeah, everyone knows it but it’s a very outdated word.

 

Keiran: Okay. Cool. Alright. And you have I think one more for us, right?

 

David: Yes. This is a really interesting one for a long time. I didn’t realize this was a purely Australian word and it’s – I don’t even count it as slang because it’s just a standard word to us, and the word is “spruik” which is spelled S-P-R-U-I-K.

 

Keiran: Spruik.

 

David: Spruik.

 

Keiran: So, how did you discover this was an Australian word or an Australian slang. I mean how did you discover it is an Australian word.

 

David: A bit of online research and because I think it’s an unusual word and…

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Just by the spelling, the U-I-K spelling it’s really considered strange for an English word accounting of many English words that have a U-I-K spelling, spruik.

 

Keiran: Yeah. It’s not a U-I-K. Yeah, even – the only – I can’t, spruik. The only thing I – the only word I can think of that same word is Buick but that’s not even a – that’s a brand of car.

 

David: Me too.

 

Keiran: So, it’s not the same. Right. That’s interesting.

 

David: Yeah. So, but this was a standard word. Basically, to spruik is to promote something. So, you would be spruiking a product, spruiking an event. Sometimes outside the front of a shop, there might be like an actor looking for work and they’d have like a microphone and amplifier and they’d be giving a promotional spiel and that is spruiking.

 

Keiran: Spruiking. Yeah.

 

David: A person’s called a spruiker.

 

Keiran: So, again, I spruik my show at the end of this podcast.

 

David: Exactly. Exactly. And that sounds completely natural. So, I don’t even count it as a kind of slang but origin. No idea.

 

Keiran: Yeah. That’s why it’s going be, I mean, that’s really interesting. It has to be somewhere from Australia obviously because we, like this is – I’ve never heard this word. I’ve never – and you’re right, if I saw this word, I would be like that’s not a word. This is misspelled. No, I’ve never seen a world spelled like that, right?

 

David: Yeah. The closest – just like guess I could make just looking at it now, it might, I mean, this is purely my idea, so there’s no research behind this. Maybe it’s from the Dutch “spreek” which would be to speak. That would be S-P-R-E-E-K, spreek.

 

Keiran: Okay. Spruik.

 

David: Yeah. Now, we have spruik. So, yeah, it’s a mysterious word which is quite a normal word to us.

 

Keiran: Yeah. That’s interesting. You could use that to screw some foreign English people from other countries.

 

David: Oh, yeah.

 

Keiran: “Hey, let’s going spruiking later today.” Like, “What?” “Yeah. Come one. We’ll tell you about it later.”

 

[laughter]

 

David: It’ll be fun.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

David: Grab this microphone.

 

[laughter]

 

Keiran: Alright. Well, David, thank you for sharing those interesting slangs, Australian slangs with us. Let’s review them really quickly before we end the podcast.

 

David: Yeah. Sure.

 

Keiran: So, the first one we had was “bugger.”

 

David: Bugga.

 

Keiran: Sorry, I got it…

 

David: Bugga. Yeah. So, remember to drop that R. You end that final R if you’re using the Australian English.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

David: Bugger maybe a combination of English bugger meaning sodomy or the Gaelic by-god, but who knows. Mystery.

 

Keiran: Right. And then we have the next one also with an E-R, which is clacker, or in Australia it would be clacker.

 

David: Clacker. You said it very well. Maybe from the Latin “cloaca”, but yeah, that’s probably, that’s the most logical connection I could imagine, but clacker, the anatomical anus.

 

Keiran: Yeah. Anatomical anus. Beautiful.

 

David: Yeah.

 

Keiran: And then, the next one we have is “struth” meaning God’s truth, right?

 

David: Exactly.

 

Keiran: It’s an old-fashioned word.

 

David: Yeah. Just to show you’re surprised. “Oh! Struth!” “Struth, mate!”

 

Keiran: Struth. And the last one…

 

David: “Struth! Bugger me!”

 

Keiran: was the Australian, what’s word I’m looking for, oh, crap! It’s the word that only exists inside of Australia, the English word…

 

David: Endemic?

 

Keiran: Yeah. There you go. Endemic. It’s endemic to Australia. Right. Spruik.

 

David: Spruik. Yeah. Spruiking and spruiker if you want to promote something.

 

Keiran: Great. So, guys, we’re going to end this podcast by spruiking myself. If you’ve liked this podcast, if David and I have well, maybe David, today has helped you learned some interesting English, then subscribe to us on iTunes. Rate it. Review it. And we’ll catch you very soon on the next podcast of Uncensored English. That’s my spruiking.

Oct 17, 2016

Ah yes, those sweet sweet dangerous topics. Today Edward and I stage a debate about the Taiji Dolphin Hunt. Come listen!

 

*** Transcript***

Keiran: What's up Edward? Good to have you back on the podcast. How is it going?

 

Edward: Things are going well. How are you doing Keiran?

 

Keiran: I'm pretty good you know teaching, podcasting, having a crappy birthday parties.

 

Edward: Okay, well, two out of three ain't bad.

 

Keiran: Yeah. So I hadn't spoken to you in a while. What's new with you?

 

Edward: I've been pretty busy teaching, editing, doing some different stuff back in Toronto now and was in Montreal for thanksgiving.

 

Keiran: Did you have any crappy birthday parties?

 

Edward: Not yet but maybe in another eight to ten months.

 

Keiran: Okay. Oh, he's hoping.

 

Edward: Yeah.

 

Keiran: Okay. So, today on the podcast we're going to do something a little bit fun here that we have never tried before. We're going to have a... a fake debate and... By fake debate, Edward and I are going to present a debate topic and we're going to take stances which may or may not be the way we really feel on the topic. And then, we're going to just have a little bit of a debate between ourselves. But before we start the debate, I'm going to just fill you in a bit about this topic. It is quite controversial so, I hope you don't find it upsetting but this is Uncensored English podcast and these are the kind of things that we can do.

 

Edward: We are here to upset you.

 

Keiran: Yes, we're here to upset you and help you learn. Okay, so we're going to be debating The Taiji Dolphin Hunt which happens in a fishing village in Japan. And I'm going to read a little bit of an article it's form Wikipedia, and might not be completely accurate but just to fill you in, okay? 


So, The Taiji Dolphin Hunt is a dolphin drive hunt that that takes place in Taiji, Wakayama in Japan every year from September to March. According to the Japanese Fishery Research Agency, a thousand six hundred and twenty three dolphins were caught in Wakayama prefecture in 2007 for human consumption or resell to the dolphinariums and most of these were caught at Taiji. The annual dolphin hunt provides income for local residents and has received international criticism for both the cruelty of the dolphin killing and the high mercury level of the dolphin meat. 


Okay, so that's as much as we're going to give the listeners. Now, we're just going to have a debate. So, Edward what's your feeling' on this topic? Are you for this historical... its kind a… of a cultural activity in Japan or are you against it?

 

Edward: In this case, I am going to say that I'm against it. And you know as far as traditional killing goes, I guess I'm traditionally opposed to a traditional killing but especially recently, I've been reading about dolphins just unrelated to this fake debate but I've been reading about dolphins and just about how intelligent they are and really how amazing they are and it does seem pretty horrible to think about killing them in any fashion. So, that's kind of what is influencing' my feelings on that matter.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

Edward: And especially they want to think about... what I've been reading about it's in terms like dolphins language abilities and you know like millions of years ago, actually dolphins were smarter than our ancestors. So, just form... I don't know ow many million years ago. Let's say 10 million years ago, dolphins actually had the potential to be smarter than we are today. Just things kind of took different directions and our ancestors ended up becoming humans and dolphins ended up being dolphins.

 

Keiran: Wow...

 

Edward: To me...

 

Keiran: I guess they should have got smarter faster because now there are food.

 

Edward: Yeah, but I mean... but do we really need to eat dolphins? It's like the… you know what I normally hear about the cases of humans eating dolphins, it’s by mistake. It's when they're tuna fishing and dolphins are always around tuna, so they end up getting kind of caught in the nets and then they're ground down into whatever becomes canned tuna.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

Edward: You know. So, it's like if 99% of the time, we are purposely avoiding dolphins in our consumption then why can't we just make it 100% at the time?

 

Keiran: Well, I mean, basically the argument is dolphins are highly intelligent animals therefore, we should not eat them. I mean, my argument is going to be that, an animal is an animal is an animal. If you're eating animals then who are you to tell other people which animals they can eat? And there are other animals that are consumed on a regular basis which are also highly intelligent animals such as pigs. So, if we're going to go around eating pigs, then why do we get to tell other people not to practice their cultural tradition which provides food for a lot of people you know, I mean that's everything about being dolphins. It's a big animal, right? And...

 

Edward: Yeah.

 

Keiran: And that's going to provide food for lots of people. I don't...

 

Edward: Can I...

 

Keiran: I don't know if an eating the dolphin is worse than eating a pig or if it's worse than eating a cow, to me. I don't know. Yeah, your purpose is to eat the animal and to keep living, not to be aware like I don't... what does intelligence have to do with anything? It's just survival.

 

Edward: I'll tell you what it has to do with it. And I'm going to go to an example that I don't even really like but Keiran, I know you have a dog. And how do you feel about people eating dogs?

 

Keiran: Well, mine, I don't actually like that dog very much to be honest.

 

Edward: Okay, well then I'm going to pull on your heart strings and I'm going to say that you had a dog before this dog.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

Edward: And how would you feel about people eating that dog?

 

Keiran: Yeah, I mean you can grow emotionally attached to anything but if came to the worst case scenario and I was starving and all I have with my old dog then I guess I would have to eat it.

 

 Edward: Okay, so are we saying that this traditional hunt is because these people are starving?

 

Keiran: No, I mean it's not... that's a good question. I don't think I [inaudible] it enough about that city and maybe the wealth of that city and whether this is just the best way for them to eat. But It's... but then if that's why we're not going to let them hunt those animals, than I guess we got to stop eating pigs or cows because cows are very soft, gentle, sensitive animals, right?

 

Edward: Yeah, you know what...

 

Keiran: Your argument is that dolphins are intelligent but cows are not creating problems out there.

 

Edward: Honestly, I don't really argue too much against that point because I think probably in another hundred years, we will be eating fewer and fewer animals. Just in terms of like you know we always talked about the water and the energy that goes into getting one cow.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

Edward: For our consumption right? So, probably you are right that if we don't eat dolphins, we should not also eat cows or pigs.

 

Keiran: Right.

 

Edward: But for the time being, people didn’t feel the same way about cows and pigs as they do about dogs and dolphins. So, I am going to argue that dolphins are actually smarter than dogs and those humans can have a better relationship with the dolphin than a dog if they had you know the opportunity to do it like we do with domesticated animals like cats and dogs. So, if people are so outraged with the idea of eating dogs, which some country still do, and I will say right now that I have eaten dog. But I can also say that... no because I 'm also going to say that I won't do it again and that I'll never eat a dolphin. And this is a fake debate.

 

Keiran: Well, it is a fake debate but I don't like the arguments so...

 

Edward: I'm trying to come at it from as many different angles as possible. This is why probably people prepare for debates.

 

Keiran: Well, I mean it's... to me I think the main reason people are against eating dolphins is just because of their intelligence and I think that's the argument that you decide to take and it's a strange thing because when you're eating something, you've already decided to not respect it and I just... I see a problem put in one animal in front of another animal like what... who's to decide that intelligence is a factor that forces us to respect an animal? Why it has a high IQ makes something more, more valuable to... not humanity but to the universe? You know like human being s are supposed to be the most intelligent animals on the planet but we're probably the most destructive. So, maybe we should just start eating each other and leave the dolphins alone.

 

Edward: Okay, see that's a very interesting point to take. I don't know how many people will agree with that but I will disagree with the idea that people don't respect animals if they eat them because if you think about someone who puts all of their energy and all of their time into raising an animal, but that a animal is going to be eaten to provide food for their family, I think they show nothing but respect for that animal like they are devoting their lives to that animal's well- being and they care for that animal up until to the point where they decide kill it, to eat it.

 

Keiran: To kill when I need it. Yeah.

 

Edward: But I think, I mean that's a crazy idea but I don't think that, that takes away any respect that they have for those animals.

 

Keiran: Well, I mean it's... that depends I mean who... if you know the person is raising the animal, fine like so my wife's family they have a farm in Mongolia and they have about 700 sheep and...

 

Edward: Yeah.

 

Keiran: I would say or honestly, that's probably the only meat I'm comfortable eating now after doing research on factory farms like the way pigs are brought up in the U.S. is deplorable. So, these are not animals that are the most of the meat are [inaudible (11:34) ] North America's not coming from animals that are being treated with respect. So...

 

Edward: Oh, I agree. I agree, yeah.

 

Keiran: And by the way, those dolphins are living in the wild. Those dolphins are probably healthier meat to eat than the pigs and the cows that we raise in North America.

 

Edward: I don't disagree with that either there. And...

 

Keiran: So, basically you're saying you would like to have some dolphin for supper tomorrow?

 

Edward: I'm saying I'm going to go hunting for a wild dog in the near future.

 

Keiran: Okay, I hope dog... well, dog is a real bony and you going to have to kill a few than to get anything.

 

Edward: Yeah.

 

Keiran: Alright, great. That was fun. That was a good fake debate.

 

Edward: Yeah, I know. I enjoy flip flopping from side to side.

 

Keiran: I mean, I...

 

 Edward: Going back and forth.

 

Keiran: I think my senses is actually real though like I don't I mean, I'm for the most part of it I am against the killing of animals for eating but I see the point of this city doing it because it's just a convenient way to go hunt and then get a lot of food, you know.

 

Edward: Right. All for...

 

Keiran: And don't think the way they do it is good but they need to eat and it's something their culture has been doing for a while.

 

Edward: Yeah. Well, for this fake debate, I was on the side of the dolphins. I think primarily because of the kind of research that I've been doing recently about just how intelligent they are, right? And we actually have in Canada a very similar issue with a traditional hunt that is very controversial and that's the seal hunt.

 

Keiran: Okay.

 

Edward: And do you know... yeah, I don't know how I feel about the seal hunt because again it's like it's a tradition that's been going on for let's say thousands of years.

 

Keiran: Yeah.

 

Edward: And it's just when people start to... attention to what is actually happening then they decided those people can't do it anymore even they'll has nothing to do with them.

 

Keiran: Yeah, it's weird.

 

Edward: It's just... It's tough to tell a group of people all that their traditions are wrong.

 

Keiran: Right, right and that's...

 

Edward:  Because they're not our traditions.

 

Keiran: That's the big issue but I'm in seals I think our ways worse than dolphins like.

 

Edward: Way worse in terms of?

 

Keiran: Seals... seals I know that seals like the father seal will like drown the baby seal and force the mother seal to give it food or something and seals rape each other and I mean, I never read the whole article about seals and the terrible things that they do but so I would have to say more up for killing seals than for killing dolphins but...

 

Edward: Okay. Well, alright.

Oct 15, 2016

Today we reveal the story telling challenge winners, I shared some adventures in improving my French fluency, talk about my crazy goals for South Korea, and lastly share with you why I think all recreational drugs should be completely legal.

Oct 12, 2016

Well some stuff happened this weekend, and now we're going to talk about it.... also we're going to talk about getting into a pickle! 

 

*** Transcript***

 

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