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Looking for a different angle on English language podcasts? Keiran the crazy Canadian goes where the other English podcasts don't... and more. Keiran and his native English guests discuss politically incorrect subjects as well as general English language, idioms, expressions, culture and more all while having natural unscripted conversations. This podcasts feature an educational exploration of language ranging from every day expressions, pop culture expressions, explicit language and anything in between. The podcast is geared towards adults students, professionals, university students as well as ESL teachers who want to step out of the "Safe Space" of the English language education community and have a little more fun. Join Keiran and his guests in their down to earth humorous conversations and learn to speak a more universal edgy form of English like a native! English ISN'T always PC!!!
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Now displaying: January, 2017
Jan 30, 2017

Parties can be among the most intimidating situations for a lot of language learners. Today Julien shares some of his mindsets about parties to help you relax, enjoy them and practice whatever language your learning with ease when you're at a party.

*** Transcript ***

 

All right. Hey, everyone. How's it going? Hope you're having a good day. And I'm really happy to have Julien back on the podcast. How's it going, man?

 

Julien:

Things are doing well over here, man. How about you?

 

Keiran:

Pretty good. Pretty good, man. It's been quite a while since we've done a podcast.

 

Julien:

Yeah, yeah. Back in January there.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, so anyways, Julien, I know you've been ... Like we talked about last time. You've been living in Mexico for a while.

 

Julien:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I know you're someone who's done a lot of traveling around the world, and a lot of my students they have- or we talk about, a really intimidating thing is when you're going out on a social event, and you have to socialize with people you don't know in a foreign language. And it's different from in school where everyone gets turns to put your hand up and talk, and it's a little more [crosstalk 00:00:51] and a party is pretty much a free-for-all, right?

 

Julien:

Yeah, that's it. No rules.

 

Keiran:

So, how have you survived in Mexico when you go to parties where not everyone speaks English? Did you find any ways to deal with it or how have you handled that?

 

Julien:

Well, I would say I had the good fortune of having a few years of basic Spanish as a teenager back in the day with you.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Julien:

And some managed to stick because I went to Spain a few times after high school and before the time I got here in Mexico so, I at least had a little bit of a base but I was nowhere near fluent from. [inaudible 00:01:28] coming down to Mexico and the accent's different, and there's just things you don't understand, expressions, and idioms.

 

 

But yeah, it took some time where I finally was able to get super confident but never hurts to try. That's really the only way to learn, and I always kind of appreciated that I was in a place where I could immerse myself and ... I work in a school, and I chit chat with some of the teachers or the caretakers there, and it kind of stays like the same kind of conversation but, as you mentioned in a party it's a bit more of a free-for-all, and I find that's when you really get challenged and ask questions about everyday life that you wouldn't normally just have in a 30 second conversation with someone.

 

Keiran:

Right, and those are probably ... Even though a lot of people don't want to put themselves in those positions, those are probably the best places to grow your fluency, right? When you really got to struggle to listen.

 

Julien:

Yeah, I think one thing that we always have to keep in mind is, when we go to parties, people aren't there because they want to hate on other people. So-

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Julien:

They probably want to have a good conversation, and even if they see that you're struggling, they're probably going to be open and welcoming, and maybe they'll run out of patience at some point but they're not going to hate you, so. As long as you're fun and smiling, and kind of trying to understand, and accepting that you won't understand everything at first, and that's totally fine because hey, you just got here or you just started speaking this language a little bit ago. Or you haven't had that much exposure or practice, and I think a party is a really good time where ... Yeah, even if you make a mistake and you end up being kind of like the one being laughed at a bit, if you can take that on, it's a big step of you getting out of your comfort zone and being comfortable in some different kind of situations you wouldn't get in a classroom.

 

Keiran:

Right. And it's exactly like you said, man. It's a party. It's a feel good environment, right?

 

Julien:

Right, yeah.

 

Keiran:

A lot of students say when I'm doing one-on-one sessions, "You're tutoring me. I'm allowed to ask you what it means. This is kind of what I'm paying you for. But if I do this at a party, people would get annoyed of me." But I'm wondering, have you ever had situations where you're at a party and you just didn't know what they said? Or you didn't know what the word or the idiom meant so you just said, "Hey, well what does that mean?"

 

Julien:

Well, I'm sure a lot of your listeners can relate in the sense that, okay, when you introduce yourself to new people at a party, it's also a bit of the same words that you use on a regular basis.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Julien:

And you're always introducing yourself, new people. It's when you're all of a sudden in a situation where there's about six, seven, eight people just speaking Spanish around you, and then you're kind of getting tired, and that party, too, might be a little later on in the day. You've worked all day.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Julien:

You're just starting to feel a little bit like, "I can't concentrate on this anymore." And me, I would just tune out sometimes. And people are going to be like, "Hey, everything okay over there, Julien?" Like, "Yeah I'm fine. I'm just really tired now." I guess I felt kind of ... Mexican people are very warm, and they're not really going to judge too hard so, at least in this kind of situation ... Yeah, I kind of pulled the plug a few times but when I had the energy in me, I knew it was always a good time to just start learning new expressions, especially that's when you hear the slang and how people talk outside of a textbook as well.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, yeah, and that's the same thing on Mongolia, man. I would always try to listen and hear the new words but I would never feel ... [inaudible 00:04:58] shut off your brain and not pay attention for a bit, right?

 

Julien:

That's it.

 

Keiran:

You could just watch people and observe the culture through body language, but-

 

Julien:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

But did you ever just ask, in a party,"What does that mean? What does that expression mean, I've never heard of that." Then people are like, "Just don't ask me that, don't even-"

 

 

That doesn't happen, does it? Or?

 

Julien:

No, I don't think it ever happened in Mexico ever once. It's just, people are a little too warm, at least I'd like to believe that we live in a world where people are interested by different kinds of people. In Mexico, people are very interested in foreigners and, "Oh, what's your story?" And they'll start speaking English first if they can, but then you can answer back in Spanish, and I find, you just kind of flow with it, too.

 

 

I never really had a problem asking someone what that meant. As long as I wasn't kind of interrupting the flow of someone's conversation or of a good joke. Maybe I would try to remember the word. Sometimes I would write it down on my phone and ask someone I cared about more later on like, "Hey, what does this mean again?"

 

 

But, yeah I really wouldn't try to be too shy. I think that's one of the most important things about languages. You're not going to be the life of the party or singing in this foreign language but to be outgoing and to step out of your comfort zone I think is really, really important in order to be able to eventually feel comfortable.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and people like helping. People like-

 

Julien:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

-helping each other. I can't imagine me being at a party and someone's saying, "Oh, what does that mean when you say 'Let's do a beer run?'" And I'd be like, "Shut up, man. Don't you know anything, you fucking idiot?" No one-

 

Julien:

Who invited this guy?

 

Keiran:

Yeah. Who invited this idiot who doesn't know everything about our culture already?

 

Julien:

Exactly.

 

Keiran:

Oh, man. So-

 

Julien:

That would be horrible if someone ever asked that.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and if someone acted rude to that person, they would probably just alienate themselves a little bit. Because a party's, it's a feel good thing, right?

 

Julien:

Yeah, that's it.

 

Keiran:

So, how about cultural differences in partying? I don't know. I've never been to Mexico. Did you see any ... Korea was just completely a different world but ...

 

Julien:

Yeah, I could say over time is when I've felt more and more that Mexico and Canada have strong differences. Chiefly in December when you come back and the difference of temperatures, 40 degrees and there's snow everywhere. Yeah, Mexico is different from Canada, and I think the number one culprit is tequila because it's just everywhere. People really like it, right?

 

Keiran:

Okay.

 

Julien:

Even mescal, which is kind of like the step before it becomes tequila, or it's more of an artisanal kind of liquor made from the same plant.

 

Keiran:

That's the one with the worm in it?

 

Julien:

It can have the worm in it, yeah. But it's kind of just like processor to before it becomes tequila. It's really good. People really like drinking. It's very strong drinking culture. And so people kind of ... they definitely push their limits, parties go a little bit later on, you can just find anything you want here. So, it's a little bit more like when you go on a party, you can really end up going to three different places at night, don't remember how you spent 2000 pesos or, I don't know, 150 bucks. Like, "Oh shit. Maybe I should remember this."

 

 

But those are the old days. In partying in general, I think it's a little bit more ... People are definitely very outgoing, and from a foreigner's perspective, people are generally interested in like, "Oh, who is this guy? Why are you at this party? Where'd you come from?"

 

Keiran:

Right. Cool, man. Is there any etiquette or things that you can do in Canada that you can't do in Mexico?

 

Julien:

Let me see here. I think a lot more of kind of like anything goes. There's some parts of the country that are more conservative. For sure in Guadalajara, and in the north it's a little bit more conservative family style. Mexico City still is very strong family values but you're not really going to get judged for going out all night.

 

 

So, I think as a whole ... I think you can do anything you want to do that you can do in Canada here. Except for maybe snowboarding, playing hockey.

 

Keiran:

All right. Nice. Cool, man.

 

 

All right. Well Julien, man. Thanks again for sharing your party wisdom, and your [crosstalk 00:09:35]

 

Julien:

Anytime.

 

Keiran:

Thanks for coming on the podcast, dude.

 

Julien:

Thanks for having me, man.

 

Keiran:

All right.

 

Julien:

And yeah, talk to you soon.

 

Keiran:

Have a good one, man.

 

Julien:

You too.

 

Keiran:

Ciao.

Jan 28, 2017

In this podcast we go over 5 surprisingly simple ways you add more English to your daily life without stressing yourself out. 

Jan 25, 2017

Today on the podcast we have an unscripted conversation about current world events for you to challenge your English with. We discuss politics, corruption, the new president and more. Feel free to join us on Sunday for the Uncensored English Café to tell us about your country and the silly issues you face. 

 

*** Transcript *** 

Keiran: All right. Hey, everyone. Welcome to the podcast. It is January the 23rd. It's Wednesday. It's hump day. We're over the week, and I'm not going to waste any time. I got a new guest on the podcast today. This guy's is an old friend of mine. He's a former roommate of mine. He's a French teacher in Mexico. Hey, Julien. How's it going, man?

 

Julien:

Hey there, Keiran. Things are doing pretty good down here. Nice to be on the show. Good to hear you.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, thanks for coming, man. Why don't you just go ahead and tell the listeners a little bit about your story? Who you are and what you're up to in your life right now.

 

Julien:

Sure. My name is Julien, and grew up pretty much right next to Keiran, not too far away. Went to high school together in Montreal and went to university there. Kind of fell into the teacher world, and nine years later I'm here in Mexico. I was teaching in Canada for a few years and kind of felt a little bit of an inkling to go somewhere else and work abroad, and fate had it that I ended up in Mexico. In Mexico City, to be specific. I teach French here in the American school, and it's been a really nice ride coming down here.

 

Keiran:

Nice. Nice. I'm just curious ... I'm not curious. I know this already because I know you, but I'm sure the listeners are going to be a little bit curious because you are fluent, obviously, in English and you're teaching French. Did you learn French growing up or were you raised in French? What's the story there?

 

Julien:

Well, actually, pretty much raised English in the household. My mother's family being English and my dad actually coming from a francophone background where they always prioritized learning English as well. He mostly talked to me in English as well. I've really got to, I guess, credit schooling over the years. I kind of went to Europe and fell in love a bit with French, and wanted to get better at it because we kind of grew up in a predominantly English neighborhood. Made some more French friends and got some French work experience, and just kind of gradually got better at the language just by immersion. What a chance we have in our city, Montreal, that you can kind of just decide to do that, and there's a whole French speaking world there. Eventually, over time I just became kind of good enough that I was able to teach some French second language and now I'm doing that here.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it's amazing that we can do that. I'm actually doing that right now. I do a few lessons online a week because it's just easy to do it from my house, but then you can just go downtown and go into any bar or go anywhere and meet French people and practice, which is awesome.

 

Julien:

That's it.

 

Keiran:

You mentioned you're in Mexico now. We had a big, fun event on Friday. Trump was officially brought in as the President.

 

Julien:

Yay. [crosstalk 00:02:58] Help us.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, exactly right. Help us, man. I'm curious, what was the sentiment that you felt where you live in the world when it was discovered that he was going to be the next President?

 

Julien:

It was kind of really interesting, if I put it nicely, kind of experience. The night before ... Some of my closest friends here are American, and one of my buddies has a barbecue restaurant. It's kind of a Texan barbecue style kind of restaurant. It kind of became the headquarters for Democrats abroad in Mexico City, and so packed houses for the debates and then on election night everything kind of ... Let's just say the white, blue, and red balloons that were suspended from the ceiling didn't end up falling, so it was kind of pretty dim. People were in shock. People were reacting kind of harshly. I was mostly around Americans at that time.

 

 

Then in school the next morning, working at the American school in Mexico City with a predominantly Mexican student body, it was kind of one of the weirdest days I've ever had to teach because I kind of automatically had to put on the counselor hat. You just kind of heard every student's reaction. One of the girls walked into the class just saying, "We're all fucking screwed." First thing. "Hey, good morning. How are you doing, Isa? Come in take a seat." Some of the others were ... I was touched because one of the girls too, I remember her, Camilla, she was just ... She's a quieter kid, and she expressed to me, "I just don't understand why he hates us this much. How could this all be?" It was kind of like, "Whoa, this is real now," and this is really going to impact these students where they're 15, 16 years old in the coming years and their relationship with the United States. Because a lot of them go study in the United States and have family there. They have two passports.

 

 

I think it was kind of a very interesting place in a sociological kind of perspective to be the day after the election. Then Mexicans in general over here were just in disbelief. I guess they dealed with it pretty well in terms of just making fun of it. They've always kind of made fun of the things that they hate. A lot of pinatas went up, that's for sure.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it's weird. I kind of thought it was going to happen, but I guess, for us living in Canada ... I wasn't surprised, and I always think, "Well, politics is not really about what's fair or what's right. It's about, I guess ..." To me it kind of swings back and forth, like left wing, right wing. Even under that assumption I just thought that he would win because we had Obama for eight years. Just like it went from Harper to Trudeau, and then it will probably go ... In my mind, it's going to go back to someone terrible. That's just how it is, right?

 

Julien:

Oh, god. Yeah, exactly. That pendulum kind of thing.

 

Keiran:

I don't know. I guess it doesn't impact us like it does them because I think when he's elected people who are kind of ... Some Trump supporters think their racist beliefs are kind of justified now. You've seen a lot more outbreaks in racism and kind of hatred towards immigrants.

 

Julien:

Yeah, definitely, and to their neighbors too. I think overall, Mexicans just feel ... I've never really been in some of the border states where there's that illegal immigration that takes place. I think it's even a different context than from where I live, but at the same time, we're definitely feeling the economic hit here. The peso dropped 20% the day of. Sorry, 12.

 

Keiran:

Wow. That's a lot.

 

Julien:

Sorry. It dropped 12% the day after he was elected, and then recently there's been some gasoline related protests because the government here put the price of gasoline up by 20%, and so the peso fell again. I make pesos, so that's kind of shitty too. It's shitty for the whole country, really.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it is shitty. What about Mexico itself? Mexico is a country I'm really unfamiliar with. I have a lot of Russian and Brazilian students online, and I know a lot about the political worlds that they live in. What about Mexico? Is it on the same scale of corruptness as all those other terrible things that happen in the world or is better?

 

Julien:

I've been here about four or five years and I still haven't met a single person that's voted for the President at the moment, Enrique Peña Nieto. He's a bit of a tool. I think a lot of people, they know he's incompetent it's just he's like a puppet. He was a governor, but he's married to a soap opera star, and so they're just this kind of glamorous couple. He's good looking. A lot of the lower classes support him just because they take him at face value and they trust the guy. He's a younger guy. "Oh, he's going to care about us," but really anybody that reads pretty up to date stuff and is current with the pulse of what's going on in Mexico, he's just so poorly seen. It's a lot of corruption because it's just a few elite people at the top that really run the show.

 

 

There's been this movement to privatize the oil sector, which is also just different interest groups getting their fair share while the majority of the people are still in a situation where they're taken advantage of. Their tax money's not really going anywhere besides these bank accounts. I don't know if I would say it's as corrupt as some countries or not, but it's definitely a whole different kind of situation than it is in Canada that's for sure.

 

Keiran:

It's hard to understand unless you live in the country I think. There's this weird trend where almost all my Russian students are people who are preparing to live in a new country, so that's why they're polishing up their English. Sometimes I'm like, "How come I don't get ..." Actually, it's not true. I've had one or two Russian students who are really fond of their culture, and that's cool to meet because all the other ones seem to be like, "I just want to get out." Which is weird because we live in Canada, and Canada's the country that everyone wants to go to. You, yourself said, you worked in Canada for few years and then you wanted to leave. Not because you don't like Canada, but I think things just get mundane and you want to experience a cultural change and experience new things.

 

Julien:

Yeah, I think it's a new era with globalization and internet. We get all these images and these accounts from people that have gone to different places. It's almost like people are a lot more keen, and it's definitely more accessible to go travel or move somewhere.

 

Keiran:

Julien, just before we finish up, I'm just wondering, what do you think is going to happen? What's your prediction into the future about how this election will effect ... I don't like to think American elections are going to effect the world, but I guess they're a pretty big military power. What do you think will happen? Do you think it will really change anything or do you think it's just a whole lot of buzz about nothing?

 

Julien:

I guess I have a couple thoughts on that. I think it's affected my life in a lot of ways. I feel like I'm living in a new era, for sure. I'm a little concern of the whole protectionist movement that Trump's espousing. "More trade within the USA, and fuck our partners." That will definitely hurt Mexico if these trends continue where can just tweet and car companies decide not to set up businesses here or big [inaudible 00:11:05] It definitely feels worrisome here, and I'm sure in Canada there's a bit of that too with just our close trading relationship.

 

 

In some way, I feel like the Trump election is also a bit of an awakening. I think people have been very apathetic overall. You see voter turnout in different countries and it's pretty ... I know a vote doesn't solve everything, but I really believe people should vote. If you see people in other countries voting 55, 60%, well, no wonder someone like trump can come to power. I think civil society has to do a little bit more to ... Each one of us just a little bit to just awaken that, "Hey, if we really let things slide they're going to get worse, so you might have to be a little bit more active in some different ways I think."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I agree with you totally. My whole mentality is I just don't think political leaders are really leaders. They're just ... In some ways our current leader is way better than our other one, and Obama was way better in many other ways, but even in his last speech there was a line he said where he's like, "We can't let countries like Russia and other countries win." To me, it's that mentality that they're pitting us against each other seems to be a huge ... It's so transparently wrong to me.

 

Julien:

That's one of the most unnerving things too lately, is I feel like it's almost like governments want us to hate each other. Our next door neighbors too. It's just we're constantly being pushed around, I feel, and I'm little worried about that, but we can find ways around it hopefully.

 

Keiran:

I think I read somewhere that if there's no problems there's no reason for politics. It's almost like they need to create some issues for them to exist.

 

Julien:

Yeah, for them to be real in our minds too, I guess.

 

Keiran:

Anyways, Julien, thanks so much for coming on here and helping me out with the podcast.

 

Julien:

Great to be on it, man. All the best to you. Good luck with the podcast, and thanks everybody for listening in.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and I hope that peso pops right back up sooner or later to help you out there.

 

Julien:

Yeah, me too, man.

 

Keiran:

All right. Ciao, man.

 

Julien:

All right, good to talk to you.

Jan 23, 2017

This weekend I took my daughter to her first skating lesson, the problem I had with her lesson is a problem a lot of people have with language schools and one you won't have learning online. We also look at some useful phrasal verbs with "slip".

 

***Transcript***

 

Hey, everyone. How's it going? Welcome to the Uncensored English Podcast for January the 23rd of Monday. How was your weekend? How was your motherfucking weekend? Was it good? Was it average? Was it bad? Was it sad? Was it lonely? Hopefully it wasn't. Mine was a lot of fun. Saturday I had a great time. We did the Uncensored English Study Skills Meetup Group in Montreal in person at Yellow Door Café. It was a lot of fun there. There were six people there. Then, Sunday we did the Uncensored English Meetup in the morning. Then, I just got back from my daughter's skating lessons.

 

 

And going to these skating lessons to me is a really good reminder of why in my opinion it's always better to learn if you can with a private tutor. My daughter was in the level two of the skating class. Level one is basically for people who can't even stand on skates, and then once you get to the point where you can stand and maybe skate a little bit, you move to level two. She can do that, so she technically should be in level two. The class was eight kids and she was by far the weakest kids, which is okay. My problem with the class was that there's eight kids and two teachers, and the teachers are just really inattentive. By inattentive, I mean she's not getting enough attention.

 

 

I watched all the classes in the last session too when she was in level one, and those teachers were fantastic. They were very attentive to all the kids. It's not that she's in the wrong level, it's just that I don't like the teachers. Of course, you don't have that problem when you're learning English or French or Spanish or Italian or whatever online, because if you have a bad teacher, then you can just cut them out of your life. It's a little tougher for me to do that. I noticed the level one class which happens the same time as my daughter's level two class, the teachers are way better. All the kids are at the same level as my daughter, so I think I'm going to try to move her down to level one just because the teachers seem to be better.

 

 

Anyways, enough of me ranting about how I'm unhappy about my daughter's lessons. Today we're going to talk about a very useful phrasal verb, or actually three very useful phrasal verbs with the verb slip. We're going to talk about slip out, slip into and slip by. We're going to start right away with slip out. So I want you guys to think about this. Have you ever been at a party and just really sucked, and it was really boring? It was very dull, and maybe you just didn't connect with the people. You wanted to leave, but you felt kind of uncomfortable leaving, because getting up and leaving would be so much more exciting than everything that is happening, that it would draw attention to yourself. Then, you got to tell people why you're leaving, but you don't really have a reason why you're leaving. You just want to get out of it because it's so boring. This is what we call slipping out. You want to slip out, you want to leave somewhere discretely.

 

 

A while ago I used to go to party with friends, you know. You're always kind of like a team when you're at party with friends. Let's say, "Okay, let's go meet those people over there, or let's go talk to these people." You tell your friend, "Look, I got to a few minutes, so if you want at ride home, you're going to have to come with me." Whenever I was at a party with some people, and I mean with a few friends, and I wasn't having a good time and I was the one who was driving, I would tell me friend, be like, "Look man, as soon as I get a chance, as soon as people are distracted, I'm going to slip out and get out of here." Which means of course I'm going to leave discretely so nobody notices. Then, I'm going to go to a more fun place.

 

 

So do you ever do that? Do you ever have slip out of a party, or slip out of a family dinner, or slip out of some kind of commitment that you have? You're at some kind of activity, and you to leave, but you don't want to draw attention to yourself so you got to do it discretely. What do you have to slip out of? Of course, slipping out of something can also mean to get out of your clothes. I'm going to slip out of these pants as soon as I get home and get into my comfy pajamas. I never say that, because I'm always wearing my pajamas unless I go outside of the house. I generally don't slip out of my clothes very often because I'm always in my comfy clothes.

 

 

All right. The next one we're going to do is slipped into, to slip into something. I generally used to slip into a lot of movies when I was younger. Again, slip into is a lot like slip out. It's doing something discretely. When we were younger, when I was 16, 17, 18, what we used to do is we'd go to a movie. You go, you pay to see your movie. Maybe some Star Wars movie when was 18. Then, after the movie was over, we would slip into another movie and not pay for it. We'd get the old two for the price of one discount. We weren't supposed to do it, but it's pretty easy to slip into an extra movie when you go to the movies. You just go into the next movie and nobody knows, because they never check your ticket once you passed the entrance of a movie theater. They only check your ticket at the front. You can really slip into three or four movies and just spend the whole day there. Probably you wouldn't get caught.

 

 

What about you guys? You guys ever slip into anything? Have you ever slipped into a bar when the bouncer wasn't looking, maybe before you were 18? You slipped into the bar because you weren't old enough to be there and you knew you were going to get carded? Actually, I think those are the only two places I've ever slipped into. A bar and ... No. I'm wrong. I've slipped into a bar. I've slipped into a movie theater, and I've slipped into a section of a sports stadium that wasn't supposed to sit in. I just say there was an empty seat and my tickets weren't as good, so I slipped in when the security guy wasn't watching. That was fun. I don't regret it because I got a good seat, and hey, no one was sitting there so nobody lost. It was a win-win. Okay, so slip out, to leave discretely. Slipped into or to slip into a movie theater is to sneak into the next movie. You slip into the theater when on one's looking.

 

 

Then, we're going to do one more which is slip by. Shit, my dog's barking. You hear that? Hold on a second. I'm going to stop it. All right. The dog's quiet now. The last one we're going to do is slip by. Slip by is a phrasal verb we use to say time has passed quickly. It's really similar to saying time flies, but we can use it in a few little different instances. For example, I remember one time I had a date. This was when I was in university. I was supposed to meet my date at ... I don't know. Let's say 7:30 p.m. at night or something at the subway station. I was just sitting at home watching some TV, having a drink when my phone rang and it was my date. She's like, "Hey, where are you? I'm at the subway station." I was like, "Oh, whoa. What time is it?" She's like, "It's 7:40. You were supposed to be here 10 minutes ago." Then, I said, "Oh, man, I'm sorry. I guess time just slipped by. Time just slipped by really fast."

 

 

I feel like everyday or every year it just feels like time is slipping by faster and faster. You know? You wake up in the morning and look at yourself in the mirror, and you just look a little bit older, a little bit uglier. You know? You ever feel like time is slipping by too fast? That's it guys. Slip by to mean time is moving fast. You better watch out or your life will slip by. It will go by very quickly. All right, guys that's the end of this podcast.

 

 

Again, I'm going to recap. We did slip out, to leave a party discretely or to leave a place discretely. You could slip out of a class while your teacher is not looking. Then, we did slipped into, to slip into a bar means to go in or to sneak into the bar so that the security or the management or whoever doesn't see you. We can also say that people sneak into stores and steal things when nobody's looking, or the robbers slipped into the bank by the back entrance and robbed the bank. To slip in or to slip into means to sneak into someplace or to go in there probably when you usually don't have permission, just like I used to slip into movie theaters. Lastly again, to slip by. Time slips by very quickly everyday. The older you get, the more it seems time is just slipping by, time is just slipping away.

 

 

All right, guys. That's the end of the podcast. I know I haven't had any guests on recently, but we got a few lined up for this week. We have a new guest, my friend, Julian who's in Mexico. He's a French teacher. He's a native English speaker. He's going to be a lot of fun. We're going to talk about parties. We're going to talk about traveling. We're going to just get to know him. We've got Anna coming back on soon. We've got Max coming on. We've got Edward coming on. We got a lot of great topics for you. I just want to let you guys know on Sunday, we're going to do the Uncensored English Café, and we're going to be talking about what The Donald being elected, coming into power, means for the rest of us. Are we all going in the wrong direction? Who knows? Join that conversation on Sunday. I'll catch you on the next episode of Uncensored English.

Jan 21, 2017

The Canadian Prime Minister is only answering questions in French....  we talk about why and if it's appropriate. How many hours does it take to move from an intermediate English speaker to an advanced level? We talk about that too

 

Sign up for Sunday's  Uncensored English Cafe meetup on Skype here

https://www.meetup.com/uncensoredenglishcafe/events/236931916/ 

Jan 18, 2017

Story telling is a big part of all of our lives and a great way to learn and practice a language. Today I invite you to share some stories in our Uncensored English Café on Sunday, and I share one of my own... but I don't tell you the end! That's up to you, shoot me an email at keiran@uncensoredenglish.ca to let me know what you think happens. 

 

*** Transcript *** 

 

Hey, how's it going guys? It is January the 18th, and it is frosty outside in Montreal. It's chilly today, it's a little cold outside. It's hump day, right? You're halfway through the week so that's a good thing. Actually, I'm kind of lying. It's not hump day, it's Monday for me. It's definitely not ... Actually it might not even be frosty outside today. Today is Monday. What the weather will be like on Wednesday, I don't know. I mean I could find it out, I could go online and look it up. I'm not going to do that. How's it going? How are you doing? We had our first uncensored English café this past Sunday. It was a lot of fun. We surprisingly had only two listeners in there, so there was room for three more. I don't know where you people were. You missed out on the fun. It was a lot of fun.

 

 

We had Barry from, he's from Montreal but he's originally born from Guinea. We had Mace, she is from Syria originally, but now she's living in Tampa. We talked about what grinds my gears, what pisses me off. It was a bucket full of fun. It was a good ... I was surprised there wasn't five people. I was disappointed in you guys, to be quite honest. Doesn't matter, just means Barry and Mace got more speaking time. We're going to do it again this Sunday, same time, same place. There's still a few spots open, go check it out if you want to join. I actually did get a message saying, someone said it's too early for them. What I'm going to do is I'm going to switch up the time of it every once in awhile so we can get different people every week. We're going to have a lot of fun.

 

 

We're also going to have a meet up in Montreal in person on Saturday at The Yellow Door, which is near the Miguel Ghetto. This is going to be a little different. I'm going to be giving out some audio files to help you guys learn English. If you're in Montreal you can come to that. We're going to be going over self study skills, so I can help you move forward in your English. As always in return, all you gotta do is give me a sweet little iTunes review. Wow, it's not that much.

 

 

Okay, so next Sunday we're going to be talking about adventures, traveling around the world. Good, the bad, the ugly. Your life experiences, great conversations. We're going to have a lot of fun. I thought ... Because that's what we're going to do on Sunday. I'm going to talk about a little adventure I had when I was in Mongolia today. I'm not going to tell you how the adventure ended. What I'm going to do is I'm going to leave it open for you guys to get back to me, to tell you what you think happened. You're going to be able to do that by writing me an email at Keiran@UncensoredEnlish.CA. That is K-E-I-R-A-N, Keiran, @UncesoredEnglish.CA.

 

 

Let's get this story started. This happened about six years ago. I was living in a city called, "Darkhan-Uul." It is in the north, central north part of Mongolia. It is close to the border with Russia, close to Lake Baikal if you know what that is. It's the largest fresh water lake in the world. Actually funny story about Lake Baikal. I try to avoid bringing it up with my wife, because as are many people around the world, my wife is ... She loves her culture, she loves where she comes from, she loves Mongolia. Apparently according to my wife, and I actually looked this up online. I did see a few articles about it. Apparently Lake Baikal used to belong to Mongolia. What happened was at some kind of political meeting between,  I guess the Mongolian president, and the Russian President. The Mongolian president offered it to Russia as a gift. However I believe he was drunk, that's what my wife says. That seems to be what the internet says. Who knows, just don't talk about that if you meet my wife, okay? She'll talk about Mongolian history forever.

 

 

All right, so I was living in Darkhan-Uul with my wife. At that time my wife was about seven months pregnant. Basically she looked like a penguin, as seven month pregnant women tend to look like. Big belly, and they tend to waddle. They don't walk normally anymore because most of their weight is in the center. One day we went to the grocery store. We were going to buy some things to celebrate. I forgot what we were celebrating. I think it's cause we got all of our Visa papers or something like that, or she got the letter of acceptance from the Guinean government.

 

 

We went to go to the grocery store to celebrate, and we got a baguette, and a bottle of wine. Wooh-wee, it was going to be a romantic evening except my wife was pregnant, so she couldn't drink cause she's a good mom. If you drink when you have a baby in you, you're probably not a good mom. We did that, and we were leaving the grocery store. Then we were walking out the entrance there, the little path to the main road. There was a group of about six ... I can't remember, I think it was about six or seven men who were just loitering there. By loitering we mean they were just standing around, they weren't doing anything. They weren't working, they weren't walking by, they were just hanging out there. Kind of like what teenagers do at malls, you know? They don't have anything to do, they just loiter. A lot of the times you see, outside of stores they'll put a sign that says, "No loitering, you can't stand around here and do nothing."

 

 

Except these group of guys weren't doing nothing, I think they were drinking a bottle of Vodka I'm pretty sure. Whatever, we walked by this group of guys. Then one of the guys said something, which I didn't really hear because Mongolian is kind of a guttural language. They don't open their mouth very much. My wife turned back and said something angrily. I knew something bad had been said. This is where I'm going to kind of pause the story. Once my wife said something angrily, those six or seven men who were all just hanging, kind of leaning on a railing or sitting, they all stood up and kind of turned towards us. I'm going to live it right here, and I'm going to let you guess. What did the guys say to my wife, and what did y wife say to the group of men. More importantly, what would you have done in that situation? What do you think I should have done in that situation?

 

 

We're going to listen to your answers. Again, email me what you thought happened. You can either write an email, or you can send an audio recording of an email. You can even send a video if you want to introduce yourself to me, that would be cool. I like to hear from you guys. We're going to talk about the result of that story on Saturday.

 

 

Now, last little thing. Actually no, that's it. There's nothing else to say guys. I'm going to catch you guys for the Saturday podcast on Saturday, obviously. Which I'll probably record tonight. Have a great week guys. Remember, the transcript is up there for this one. Rate it, review it, subscribe if you're new to the podcast. We'll catch you next time on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

 

 

 

Jan 16, 2017

Today we have a fun fluffy episode for a change. Anna and I discuss onamatopeia, in other words, words we use for sounds that sound like the sound.

 

***Transcript***

 

Keiran:

How's it going everyone? It's good to be back on the podcast. Today we have our favorite Australian.

 

Anna:

Oh stop. Stop it. Stop it. Really, honestly, stop it. Keep going. Keep going.

 

Keiran:

You like it. You want the flattering.

 

Anna:

I deny nothing.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, we got Anna back on the podcast. How are you doing Anna?

 

Anna:

Very well, thanks Keiran. How are you doing?

 

Keiran:

I'm doing well. I'm doing well. And uh what's new with you these days? It's been quite a long time since we've talked.

 

Anna:

I don't know. Just the usual really. Teaching, singing, having a laugh. What about you?

 

Keiran:

I don't know. It's my day off. It's a Wednesday, so it's basically my day where I don't get paid but I work anyways. It's fun because it's the passion project stuff. So uh today, we had a fun topic we've chosen by your suggestion. I've never done this, so I was like, "Yeah. Why not?" Actually, I don't even think I covered this when I was teaching in ESL schools, but it is a fun topic. We're going to do onomatopoeias.

 

Anna:

I don't know if there is a plural of it. I think it's just onomatopoeia always.

 

Keiran:

Is it just onomatopoeia?

 

Anna:

I think it is.

 

Keiran:

That's a good question.

 

Anna:

I think it's a Greek word or something.

 

Keiran:

It's non-countable.

 

Anna:

There you go. It's a non-c- It is a Greek word. There you go.

 

Keiran:

Is it?

 

Anna:

Onomatopoeia. It is, and it sometimes turned into late Latin according to this etymology that I'm looking at.

 

Keiran:

I would feel bad making it plural, but like I just said, I've never done it. I guess you get to learn your first time, right?

 

Anna:

There you go. See, I taught you something today Keiran.

 

Keiran:

Yes. Thank you. Before we get into it, can you explain what is onomatopoeia?

 

Anna:

Onomatopoeia is basically a word that sounds like the thing it describes. So if you think about, for example, animals sounds are a good way to think about it. You got the cat going, "Meow," and so we say, "Meow". When you have a cow it goes, "Mooorh." We don't really have that sound in English, so we say, "Moo." It sounds close to what you're describing. And of course, as we'll see, there are all different types of onomatopoeia that describe different sound effects or things that you hear out and about.

 

Keiran:

Right, I guess the people that are listening could also think of the old school Batman TV shows. Whenever they would hit someone, it would go like, "Paff" or like "Smack" or something, and they have the-

 

Anna:

Pow.

 

Keiran:

Pow.

 

Anna:

Bam.

 

Keiran:

All those punches that made pow sounds.

 

Anna:

Exactly. Exactly, that's spot on.

 

Keiran:

Let's go back to what you just said. Let's start with animal sounds. You said, "Moo" and "Meow." The funny thing is is I think we all have onomatopoeia that I guess we're raised with. My wife and I always have this argument about dogs. The onomatopoeia that we have for dogs is bark, bark bark, woof woof, or ruff ruff. And when I went to Mongolia, why wife was just like, "What are you? It's not 'bark'. It's 'how how how'. It's 'how how how'. All the dogs go 'how how how'". I guess we all have our own.

 

Anna:

I'm just trying to think like, "How how how how." Yeah, there you go. Yeah, yeah, okay.

 

Keiran:

A dog can make that sound I guess. It's just funny, because I think there's some that are universal like cows. Everyone knows a cow goes, "Moooooo".

 

Anna:

Even in German they say, "Kuh macth moo".

 

Keiran:

They say what?

 

Anna:

"Kuh" which means cow, "macth", does, "moo".

 

Keiran:

Cow does moo. Right.

 

Anna:

Kuh macth moo. It rhymes in German which makes it funnier.

 

Keiran:

Yeah yeah that does make it. Everything that rhymes is always funnier and more enjoyable. That's dogs. See, we had dog, bark, woof, and if you're in Mongolia apparently the dogs go, "How how how."

 

Anna:

They really don't know how to do anything. They're just like, "How? How?"

 

Keiran:

"How? How? How do I do this?" What other ones do you got? What are common on your end or the earth?

 

Anna:

Yeah uh, I really want to talk about one, because it's from Australia and I think it's really interesting which was an advertising campaign in Australia. As you may know, Australia is known for being a very hot country. We also have a giant hole in the ozone layer over our country. There's a lot of skin cancer basically in Australia because of the strength of the sun. It's not just hot; it's actually the UV rays are stronger. The government started a campaign, and it was called, "Slip. Slop. Slap."

 

Keiran:

What do these words mean?

 

Anna:

You have no idea what I'm- Slip is like when you slide something onto you. In this case, it was meant to represent a t-shirt. You don't go out with a bare chest. The idea is you wear a t-shirt when you go to the beach or something like that. That's slip on a shirt. Slip is the first one.

 

Keiran:

Slip on a shirt. Right.

 

Anna:

Slip on the a shirt. The second one was slop, and slop we normally associate with liquids or food that is runny like a stew or a soup or something like that. That idea of the liquid moving around. Slop, slop, slop, slop, slop.

 

Keiran:

I'm even thinking of like pig slop. It's a runny liquid, right?

 

Anna:

That too. Here though they're referring to sunscreen. They'd say, "Slop on some sunscreen." You slop it. Go slop onto your skin and then rub it in so there's a lot of it. The last one is slap, and slap is normally actually used to describe when you hit someone with an open palm. I'm sure you know that. In this case, they're talking about slapping on a hat. Just quickly putting a hat on your head so it's like a slap. It just goes, "chuk" straight onto your head. Altogether, they said, "Slip. Slop. Slap." This was a very common saying in Australia to promote sun safety.

 

Keiran:

It's funny about Australia that you mention that, because when I was in Australia was when I really got my education about the sun. I think it's just because, like you guys said, you guys have stronger ... You have a hole over the ozone. I was always the person who tanned. I was like, "Aw. I'm gonna go tan. I love tanning." After I went to Australia was I like-

 

Anna:

Oh, you sweet summer child.

 

Keiran:

I know. Then I'm like, "Oh my God. This is bad. I gotta stop doing this."

 

Anna:

We learn young. We learn very young in Australia. That's true.

 

Keiran:

Good. "Slip. Slop. Slap." It was slip on a shirt, which is the sound of putting on a shirt on quickly. Like the whish, yeah? Then slop. Slop on the sunscreen. Then slap on a hat. Dependent on how much sun cream is in the bottle I guess. Then slap on the hat, right?

 

Anna:

Yeah. Just slap it off.

 

Keiran:

That's great. Slap brings me to the next one, and I like to use this one with my students. You know when you're having a conversation, from time to time, you guys talk about something that's important in your life. I think we've all had experiences where someone offends us or someone rubs us the wrong way. Just for fun, just for humor, I just say, "Well, you know, next time that happens," and then I just give a visual of my hand and put my other hand on it, "You just go up to that person, and you just slap them." I'm honestly joking, but that always just makes the students so happy to know that we can pretend to get our revenge. You don't actually do it.

 

Anna:

I don't know. I think the last time we spoke, I mentioned I actually did slap someone as well. Sometimes ...

 

Keiran:

That's probably one of those rare times where you got to reinforce your boundaries, right?

 

Anna:

Yeah, that's true.

 

Keiran:

Most of the times, we don't want to. I've slapped people too before. One time I slapped a bouncer at a night club. I think it was warranted. I worked at many night clubs, and this guy just ... The club was filled with our staff, 120 of our staff members, and I was going outside. I was on my phone, and I was standing in the doorway. He just gets in and he just grabbed me by under the arm and yanked me out of the doorway. I got in his face. I'm like, "Dude, you could've just told me, you know?" Bouncers, sometimes they're great people, but sometimes they have big egos. I was really drunk, and I just slapped him the face. I bitch slapped him like "psh". I remember his face was just like ... He just looked at me right away like he was going to kill me. I was lucky because there was about 20 other guys there who were with me, and they kind of stopped the thing from escalating. It was a good slap sound.

 

Anna:

It sounds like it. It's also for a less violent situation is for a high five.

 

Keiran:

The smack or the slap of a high five. Right.

 

Anna:

You just say, "Give me five." We don't say, "Slap me five."

 

Keiran:

I'd say, "Give me five" or "High five".

 

Anna:

It is a slap sound.

 

Keiran:

We did dog sounds. We did slap. We did "Slip. Slap. Slap." "Slip. Slop. Slap." Slap. Dogs sounds. Anything else before we wrap this up, Anna? What else do you go in your-

 

Anna:

Yeah, actually. Your talking about Batman before made me think of two that are a little bit similar but slightly different, which is bam and bang. Bam is like the sound we normally associate with two heavy objects of some sort colliding with each other. For example, if something like a car runs into a wall, we might say, "Bam." Like, "Whoa." Like it hit it really hard. Bam. There's also a famous "Futurama" reference, I don't know if you know this, when there's a cook and he's got this special spice he uses. Every time he puts it into his soup he goes, "Bam." I think put it into the vernacular for use now for whenever you really do something really well you just go, "Bam. I did it." Yeah, like awesome.

 

 

Bang is kind of similar but different. We usually use it for the sound of explosions. Rather than two things colliding together, it's the sound of something exploding apart, this bang. Like we say, "The Big Bang" for example. The beginning of the universe is that example of something exploding out. That big sound.

 

Keiran:

The exploding of a star or something. Right. Bang. Bang. Bam. I think I do use bam sometimes. Just when you do something well. I'm just like-

 

Anna:

Exactly. You're like. "Yeah, awesome. Bam."

 

Keiran:

"Bam. Got it done." Exactly. Bam

 

Anna:

Nailed it.

 

Keiran:

Bang, bang, bang. Bang. The other thing bang is is guns.

 

Anna:

Guns.

 

Keiran:

Guns. I was just thinking of the song, "Bang Bang."

 

Anna:

"Bang Bang."

 

Keiran:

I love that song.

 

Anna:

It's a great song.

 

Keiran:

That's it. Let's wrap this up. We did onomatopoeia. We did dog sounds. We laughed at the cultural difference between dogs.

 

Anna:

How, how, how.

 

Keiran:

How, how. Those confused Mongolian dogs.

 

Anna:

It's like, "Fetch the ball. Fetch the ball." "How. How."

 

Keiran:

Then we did, "Slip. Slop. Slap." Which was? One more time.

 

Anna:

Slip on a shirt. Slop on some sunscreen. Slap on a hat.

 

Keiran:

Then we did smack. No we didn't do smack. We did bam and bang. Bam.

 

Anna:

Bam and bang.

 

Keiran:

Bang like an explosion and bam.

 

Anna:

Bang can mean one other thing Keiran.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, we can go down that dirty road. It doesn't really mean. I mean, it means it, but it doesn't make the sound. I think we would use smack more for that. Maybe we'll talked more about the "Smack, smack, smack" in another episode.

 

Anna:

We won't talk about the slop in that case.

 

Keiran:

We'll leave it to the smack and the ...

 

Anna:

Smack and the bang.

 

Keiran:

On that hilarious note, we just want remind you guys if you want to have a hilarious and fun and engaging lesson with Anna, you can get in touch with her. What's the website they go to schedule a session with you Anna?

 

Anna:

I'm on italki as well, so it's italki or italki.com/anna.m.

 

Keiran:

Anna.m.

 

Anna:

That's m for Mary, not N, Nellie.

 

Keiran:

Italki.com/anna, A-N-N-A, .m for Mary. Thanks so much for coming on again and making this another hilarious episode.

 

Anna:

Of course. I'm sure it won't be the last time.

 

Keiran:

We'll catch you next time Anna.

 

Anna:

Absolutely. Thanks again Keiran.

 

Keiran:

Ciao.

 

Keiran:

I close it.

Jan 14, 2017

Reading a foreign language can sometimes be slow and tedious. Today we discuss some reading techniques to help you retain more, we also talk about UE Café and more!

 

 

Jan 11, 2017

In today's podcast we look at the insanity of how movie theaters treat their clients with a few comical comparisons. We also discuss a hilarious method one of my students used to make a major correction to his English. Remember we're also kicking off our first Uncensored English Café at meetup. com, https://www.meetup.com/uncensoredenglishcafe/events/236790195/ only 3 spots left. 

 

*** Transcript***

 

Hey everyone, how's it going? Welcome to Wednesday! It's Wednesday. It's hump day. How you doing? Hope you're doing well. Hope you're doing great. Hope you're doing dandy, meaning good of course. I'm doing fantastic. It's actually Tuesday on my side right now but you guys are gonna hear this on Wednesday likely. I just had such a great morning and I was so happy to see one of my students who has just made huge progress since we've started. I noticed today that he has completely eliminated, not completely, almost completely eliminated a huge mistake he was making before, a huge grammatical mistake. I was just so proud of him, man. It just goes to show that if you work hard and if you work smart, you can progress in your English quickly. He hasn't been doing English lessons that long.

 

 

I asked him, "Hey man, have you done anything else to get over this mistake that you were making?", and he had been doing something. He had this amazing tip. I was just like, "man, this guy is such a smart student". He said, I'm just gonna give the credit to him right now because I know he doesn't care, Alex, one of my students, Alex, he told me that when he has some kind of time waster he does in his life, he makes sure that it's useful. Instead of just going online and writing on Facebook in Russian, maybe he's finding something to do in English.

 

 

He had a very funny one which I like particularly. I think it was hilarious. He goes on a website called 9GAG. I think it's a kind of comedy based website, I'm not really sure. I'm gonna go there right now and check it out. Basically he gets into arguments with people online. If you make a grammatical mistake, people mock you, so he has really good motivation to win his arguments. He improved, man, and he got rid of that mistake he was making. Hey, Alex, give yourself a pat on the back again. Good job, keep going man. It's great to see people improving like that.

 

 

Before I get deeper into the podcast, I already probably announced this in the intro, I'm gonna do it again, we got the first Uncensored English Conversation Café on Sunday. You can join it by going to the Meetup group and RSVPing. There's only room for five people when we start it so you better be there on time. You gotta review a podcast first to be a part of the group. You gotta go to iTunes and write me a review and confirm it and don't just press the stars. I mean, write something, write something thoughtful. "Hey Keiran, I like this podcast because A, B, C, blah, blah, blah" and confirm that or send it or whatever button you have to press. I gotta see it on my end on iTunes. Then we're gonna have a one hour conversation about what grinds your gears, argh, about your country. What pisses you off about your culture. Remember, this is not a chance to attack other cultures, other countries, other religions. It's gotta be about your own. We're laughing at ourselves here, we're not laughing at others. Of course, you can laugh at me when I make fun of my culture, but you can't just go shit on people. If you want to shit on people, just go do it on any other random website. That's pretty much what 90 percent of the internet is.

 

 

All right, today we're just gonna talk about a few things. I'm gonna give you guys some ideas for the Uncensored English Café that's gonna happen on Sunday, for those of you who are gonna join us. For those of you who are not gonna join us, it's just basically gonna be a review on Monday's podcast which is good because if you want to learn and retain things, you gotta review it. That's just basic.

 

 

I'm not sure if you guys noticed, but Monday's podcast, it took me about I think three or four attempts for Max and I to actually get that podcast done, which is very strange. Usually, the podcasts are just one offs. By a one off, I mean we just do it one attempt. We don't have to record it several, several times, but on Monday, we didn't record it on Monday, we recorded it before Monday, when we tried to record it we were both just in such low energy states that every time we did a podcast, I just couldn't. I was like "no, this is not good enough. We both have low energy. It's boring. I don't want people to listen to this garbage!" It was terrible, so we recorded it several times. Even in the beginning it started a little slow, but I know it picked up at the end and it good content in it so I published that one.

 

 

We're gonna review it again today. I'm gonna talk about something I did over the holidays. I went to see two movies. I'm wondering if you guys have gone to see movies lately. The two movies that I saw were, I know I count pronounce this, 'Moana', 'Moana', it's not an English name. 'Moana' is the kids movie about the little island girl who has to save her island and I guess the whole world. She has the help of this demigod to do it. The other movie I saw was 'Sing'. It's like a musical for kids, another animated movie. I know what you're thinking. You're probably thinking, "Keiran, is all you see kids movies?", and yes, pretty much that's all I see. I don't see anything else for the last four years. Every single friggin' movie I've seen has been a kids movie.

 

 

I've noticed a strange pattern in the kids movies, I wonder if you have, I don't even think it's patterns in kids movies, it's patterns in general. It seems like every single movie I see, the underlying message is "you gotta find your path in life and follow it and then everything will work out!" I gotta be honest. These movies get to me a little bit. I always have this moment in the movie where I'm like, "Oh my God, he's doing it. He's accomplishing his dream!" It touches you in an emotional way for a second but can't they come up with a different storyline, man? It's the same thing in every one. I don't know.

 

 

Anyways, that's not what grinds my gears. I'm not gonna shit on the movies. I actually liked both the movies. I think they're, there was not really a deep meaning in either of them, or a deep message or anything, but they were nice. They were fun. They were entertaining.

 

 

My problem is the movie theater. I think I'm becoming way more anal about this now that I'm older and I work full time and I have less free time, but the movie theater in Canada is not a cheap place. I'm gonna go with my wife and my daughter. We each get tickets. My ticket is like 11 or 12 dollars, I think. Then, if we're getting the 3D movie, which now most of the movies are 3D movies, they're gonna tack on I think like an extra 3 bucks per ticket. Basically, I'm paying for four tickets. What really grinds my gears about this is that the 3D movies themselves are complete bullshit. There are no 3D effects in these movies. I don't know if you've noticed this, but maybe in the beginning they put like one or there's nothing at all. What they do is they just, if you don't have the glasses on, the movie is just slightly out of focus. Basically you're paying the 3D price to get a normal movie.

 

 

That really grinds my gears because I remember the first time I saw a 3D movie was like, I think it was about 10 years ago with my friend and we saw the, what was it? What's that TV show where those guys always do stupid things and hurt themselves? Oh no, I can't remember. Hold on, I'm gonna find it. Gimme a second. Gonna look it up online. This is the benefit of doing a podcast while I'm at my computer. Jackass, yeah, it was the Jackass movie. It was the Jackass movie. It was awesome. The 3D effects were awesome. It was totally worth the extra money. All these other movies are complete bullshit. There's no 3D effects, they're just juicing us. They're just charging us the 3D effect and they're not giving you the extra movie, the extra effects. That's one thing that grinds my gears.

 

 

Here's the other thing that grinds my gears about movie theaters is the previews. Man, the previews are so annoying. You go to pay for a movie, and the movie says it's gonna start at 3:20 but then you've gotta sit through 30 to 45 minutes of previews. Doesn't that piss you off? I know some people like the previews. Every once in a while there's a preview there that is interesting to you, but here's the thing, 90 percent of movies are garbage. 90 percent of the previews, even if you think they're good, those movies are gonna be garbage. You're paying to see a movie you want to see and then they're just saying, "Well, you can see the movie, but before that, look at all this crap." I don't know. I find that's kind of disrespectful. I think we're just used to it. I think most of you out there are like, "the previews are good, I like the previews".

 

 

Think about this, let's imagine this in another situation. Let's imagine you went to a restaurant, okay. You go out with your boyfriend, your girlfriend, your husband, your wife, your family, a friend, whatever. You go to a restaurant. You sit down, they bring you the menu, you order your meal, you wait 15, 20, 30 minutes, however long it usually takes. Then, before they bring you your meal, they bring you food that they don't serve at the restaurant. They just show it to you and they tell you about it and they talk about it for about 5 or 10 minutes and then they take it away. Isn't that fuckin' retarded? Wouldn't you be pissed off? You'd be like, "No, just give me the food I ordered. That's why I came here. I didn't come here to see this other food. It's a Thai restaurant. I wanted Thai food. Why are you showing me Indian food before I eat my Thai food." You want to see Star Wars. You came there to see Star Wars. Show me Star Wars, don't show me about some chick flick that's gonna happen two months down the road. That makes sense right? That's what grinds my gears about movie theaters. That's what pisses me off about movie theaters.

 

 

I hope if you guys are listening to this and you're gonna do the Uncensored English Café on Sunday morning, that this gives you an idea of something you can use. We're gonna have a great conversation, one hour long. One hour long with friends. We're gonna talk about what pisses us off, what grinds our gears. Think about a topic if you're coming and remember to go on iTunes and give us a review. Type in your thoughts, click it. You gotta do that before you do the Uncensored English Café.

 

 

I want to do one more example, one more example about how fuckin' stupid it is with these movie theaters. Let's imagine another scenario. Screw restaurants. Let's imagine you go clothes shopping. I hate clothes shopping already. I do it like once a year, max. Let's say you gotta go clothes shopping, you gotta go buy some new pants. You go, you find your pants. You try on your pants and you get them. You're going to the cash and you're about to pay. You're about to give the lady your card or the man your card, but they guy says, "Okay, before you want to pay, before we pay, before we just run this through, I just want to tell you about this great new fashion line we have coming out next month. Carol, can you come help me and show off the new skirt we're gonna be selling?" Then some woman comes and shows you all these clothes that you can't buy right now and you can buy in the future. You haven't asked about them but they're just gonna shove it in front of your face. That's what they're doing at movie theaters. I don't know. It pisses me off. It grinds my gears.

 

 

I think that's it guys. I'm gonna wrap this one up. We're gonna see you on Saturday. We're doing the storytelling challenge. That's gonna be fun. Don't forget about that. Sunday, if you're up for the Uncensored English Café, don't wait, there's only I think three more spots left, two of them are gone. Go on the group, join, RSVP it if you want to come and write that review for us on iTunes for Uncensored English Podcast. That's it, guys. We'll catch you on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

Jan 9, 2017

Today on Uncensored English we discuss things that grind our gears. Max the American is back on and we have a fun convo about all those silly inconveniences in life. Transcript available and don't forget to sign up for the Uncensored English Cafe on Sunday.

 

Keiran:

Hey Max, how's it going man?

 

Max:

Super good. How are you doing Keiran.

 

Keiran:

I'm doing good. I'm doing good. It's been a while since you were on the podcast. You were on here back in December, early December, I think you did the storytelling challenge with Pavel.

 

Max:

Yeah. Yeah, that was a lot of fun.

 

Keiran:

What have you been up to since then?

 

Max:

Since then I've gone on a trip. I'm in the United States right now. Mostly just continuing working. I guess everybody just has to work all the time. Besides that, having a trip home right now. It's pretty fun.

 

Keiran:

Basically, same shit, different day, but you're at home instead of in Montreal.

 

Max:

Yes sir.

 

Keiran:

All right, nice. Okay, so today I'm excited to have you back on the podcast helping me. You said you were going to help me do a podcast this morning and that got delayed.

 

Max:

Got delayed a lot. Got delayed a lot.

 

Keiran:

Got delayed a a lot, yeah.

 

Max:

Yeah, yeah.

 

Keiran:

First it was your fault.

 

Max:

I needed ... For my meeting. I had a meeting to do.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, you had a legitimate reason.

 

Max:

Yeah, I'm very important.

 

Keiran:

Right, and then it was my fault.

 

Max:

What was your reason?

 

Keiran:

My reason was I was too tired because I was emotionally drained from being angry that I was experiences technical difficulties with my podcast.

 

Max:

Right, right. It wasn't uploading your actual podcasts.

 

Keiran:

Well, I uploaded it. It just didn't display it on the iTunes news feeds and that's really bad for me because then people won't find my podcasts and people who are listening won't find it. That brings us to our topic for the today, which is it pisses me off. It really pissed me off.

 

Max:

Yep, pisses me off.

 

Keiran:

I could also say, we could also say ... What's another idiom for something that frustrates you?

 

Max:

Grinds my gears.

 

Keiran:

Grinds your ... What grinds your gears man?

 

Max:

Oh man, needy bosses, controlling bosses grinds my gears. I'm pretty sure I've complained about bosses before so people will remember maybe.

 

Keiran:

Was that grinding your gears this morning when you had your meeting?

 

Max:

A bit, because I woke up at 8:00 for a meeting and there was somebody else in there doing it already and I was like, why would you put both of us here? Only one of us had to be here. One of us could've slept until 9:00, like a lazy bastard like I am, but no, I was awake. I was awake.

 

Keiran:

You know what also grinds my gears is that you have to wake up at 8:00 for a morning meeting.

 

Max:

Oh yeah. It used to be 7:30, had to be at the office already.

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Max:

I smartened up and started calling while I was commuting. That's a smart trick. All you guys can use that, all the listeners. Call into your meeting with your personal cell phone. It's worth the minutes.

 

Keiran:

So what's your call? You just say, "Oh sorry, I'm in the car. There's traffic. Don't worry, I'll be there in a few minutes." Then you boss is like, "Max, you're grinding my gears. Why are you always late?"

 

Max:

Hahaha "You grind my gears so much you're fired. You're fired." I don't know. They just hear this though, whenever I unmute my phone in the bus, all they hear is brrrrrrrrrr from the bus engine going off in the back.

 

Keiran:

Right, yeah. Oh man Max.

 

Max:

Oh Keiran, what what what pisses you off besides your tech?

 

Keiran:

Well, I think what pisses me off is when there's a technical problem that I can't solve. That really grinds my gears or that pisses me off. When it's my problem and I've caused it I'm not upset because I'm like, "You know what? I'm the cause. I can resolve it.", but if I've paid money for a podcasting service and my podcast, I've created it, I've edited it, I've uploaded it, I made it all nice and pretty and I put a thumbnail for the picture and everything and I upload it and nothing happens to it, that really fucking pisses me off or grinds my gears.

 

Max:

Right. When it's something that you're paying for up front?

 

Keiran:

Yeah.

 

Max:

You're mad that it's not doing what it should be?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, exactly. It's frustrating because all these companies now online, there's no one to contact.

 

Max:

Oh.

 

Keiran:

Whenever you have a problem you just sent a help email and then they'll get back to you in 24 hours.

 

Max:

You can't call? You can't call and be like, "Hey, let's fix this right now."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, there's no contact number because they don't want to pay people and a call center to talk to you, you know?

 

Max:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it's also hard to hire. A lot of people get pissed off working in a call center.

 

Keiran:

Right. Yeah, exactly. Call centers are terrible jobs. I've done those. You don't want to work in a call center.

 

Max:

I never did it but I heard stories.

 

Keiran:

Is pisses me off and grinds my gears, are those completely interchangeable in your mind?

 

Max:

This pisses ... Yeah, totally. This pisses me off is like saying ... Well, one's stronger but they have the same general idea.

 

Keiran:

Which is stronger? For the listeners out there.

 

Max:

It pisses me off is way stronger.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, it is very strong. That makes me very, very angry, extremely angry, right?

 

Max:

Yeah, yeah.

 

Keiran:

Like when we were ...

 

Max:

It's almost ... Yeah?

 

Keiran:

Go ahead.

 

Max:

It's almost like the equivalent of Caps Lock online. It's a jump.

 

Keiran:

Oh yeah, when people write messages all in caps. That grinds my gears. I'm like, "Really? Do you need to yell your point online? No one can hear." I have a friend who everything he writes is in caps.

 

Max:

Oh no.

 

Keiran:

He's the only exception because he just speaks loudly. I think he's actually transferred his personality over online really well, you know?

 

Max:

Gosh, it's kind of like how a dog would type online. "HEY!", all in capital letters.

 

Keiran:

What pisses you off man? What's grinding your gears in your life right now, besides your early morning meetings?

 

Max:

What else makes me upset? It's hard to travel. Ticket prices are really high. If you want to travel somewhere even close by, if you're not a few months in advance, it's still going to cost you several hundred dollars.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, you know what? It's not that it's hard to travel. It's just that you live in the wrong place.

 

Max:

Oh, what do you mean?

 

Keiran:

If you were in Europe you could get a flight ticket to almost anywhere for under a hundred bucks, but you're in the US, Canada. There's just nowhere you can go without paying $500, $600 for a round trip.

 

Max:

No, I agree, and it pisses me off that that's the situation that I'm in. I agree that it's easier and cheaper to travel elsewhere, but it still sucks.

 

Keiran:

Is there anything that grinds your gears about your family?

 

Max:

I'm staying at their house right now, so no. Everything is perfect. I love them all.

 

Keiran:

Really?

 

Max:

No, okay, I got one. I got one. I do love my family.

 

Keiran:

Come on man, vent. Vent for the people.

 

Max:

It pisses me off when we're all watching our own Netflix and then it slows down and stops. It's just like, "Stop watching TV!" You go and talk to each other and try to stop the bandwidth from being all used up.

 

Keiran:

Yeah. Yeah, I know what you're talking about. That used to happen during my Skype sessions with my students during the summer.

 

Max:

Oh no.

 

Keiran:

My wife would be not at school and she'd just be like watching YouTube videos and I'm like, "Baby, I'm teaching. Stop it."

 

Max:

"You're messing up work."

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and she had to stop, and that grinded her gears but, well, my gears are more important than hers in this situation.

 

Max:

If your gears are making money at the time, yeah.

 

Keiran:

And hers are not, yeah exactly.

 

Max:

Did you buy her a book? It costs less bandwidth.

 

Keiran:

No, she's got books. She doesn't need a new book man. No, you know what really grinds my gears man? In my family we have family dinners.

 

Max:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

They're not obligatory but they happen every night, which is excessive to me.

 

Max:

That is excessive.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and every dinner's the same dinner. My mom and my dad sit down and my mom's like, "How was work Kevin?", and then my dad's like, "Ugh, everything's going terribly.", and then my mom's like, "Well, you have to change your life. You got to stop working so much." My dad's like, "Ugh, oh Kathy you don't understand." I'm just sort of like, "Ugh, you've had this conversation at least 20 times man."

 

Max:

Oh my God. Invite me for dinner. I want to hear it.

 

Keiran:

That pisses me off. I'm just like, "No, I can't sit through this again."

 

Max:

That's awesome. That's so funny.

 

Keiran:

What about you? You don't have any family drama man that grinds your gears? From all your pictures on Facebook you seem like a very together, lovey-dovey family.

 

Max:

Yeah, it's pretty okay. I don't know, maybe when I was younger. I got more patient now. My sister texted me the other day and it was a question. She didn't write out the question but she was asking me if I was going to be ready for 5:00 so we could go to a bar. She wrote me a question and I was like, "Yes." All she wrote to me was, "Well?", and I answered, "Yes." Then she wrote long form, "Are you going to be ready for the dinner or the bar? That's what I was asking?" I was like, "If you want a complete sentence answer, write a complete sentence question. I answered you with the same amount of words that you sent me. Why am I going to have to type all the words of the sentence and you don't have to? Why do you get to be lazy?"

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's funny.

 

Max:

I was mad.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's just reciprocation man. You're just giving her what she gave you. That's fine.

 

Max:

My back was bristling. If I had hair that could spike up, my neck would've been pointy. I could feel the warmth and the prickles, and like I'm going to punch a brick wall. It was one of those really weird rage moments.

 

Keiran:

That's hilarious man. All right. Well Max, thanks for coming on the podcast and helping us talk about what grinds our gears.

 

Max:

Thanks for having me, happy to be here.

 

Keiran:

Let's just go over it one more time. It grinds my gears means ...

 

Max:

It means that it upsets me. I thought you were going to say it. It means that it upsets me.

 

Keiran:

It grinds my gears when I ask questions and nobody answers.

 

Max:

It grinds my gears when Keiran is unclear about who is supposed to answer his question, himself or me.

 

Keiran:

Yeah right.

 

Max:

It grinds my gears, yeah. It grinds my gears is you're frustrated and a little bit angry about something happening in your life.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, and then pissed off is just two notches higher. It's a stronger way to say something really angers you, right?

 

Max:

Yeah, it's like grinds my gears is frustrated and angry and pissed off is angry and angry, even more.

 

Keiran:

Right, exactly. All right. Max, thanks. Thanks so much for coming on again man and helping us out.

 

Max:

Thanks bud.

 

Keiran:

All right. You guys didn't see that. He just did some weird bow. All right.

 

Max:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I'll talk to you soon dude.

 

Max:

Bye Keiran.

 

Keiran:

Chow.

Jan 7, 2017

Today on Uncensored English we talk about how I beat out all the smart kids on a Spanish book report, we also discuss the story telling challenge #3, a useful expression and more!

Jan 5, 2017

Do you want to become more fluent? You realize you got to constantly challenge yourself then right? No worries, we're doing the Story telling challenge again soon. On this podcast Yasuyo joins David Peachey and I to challenge her English. Join our newsletter if you want to participate in the next one!

Japanese Firefighters Click Here 

***Transcript*** 

Keiran Watters:

Okay, hey everyone, how's it going? Today we have on Uncensored English the third winner from the story telling challenge number 2 back on the podcast. How's it going Yasuyo?

 

Yasuyo:

Great, thank you.

 

Keiran Watters:

Good, great and we also have one of our regular guests who's been on the podcast quite frequently, David Peachy. How you doing David?

 

David Peachy:

Hey, Keiran it's great to be back! How you doing?

 

Keiran Watters:

Good, I'm doing good, thank you. So what we're going to do today is we're going to give Yasuyo a topic that's relevant to her life. She doesn't know what it is yet so this is kind of a challenge for her and she's going to explain it to you David.

 

David Peachy:

Okay.

 

Keiran Watters:

And then we're just going to have a conversation about this crazy topic that we're going to talk about.

 

David Peachy:

I can't wait.

 

Keiran Watters:

All right, great. So Yasuyo, I'm going to send you a message and you're going to open up this website and you're going to have to describe to David what you see in the pictures on this website, okay?

 

Yasuyo:

Mm-hmm  okay, I see.

 

Keiran Watters:

And for the people who are listening I'm going to put the link in the description so you guys can look at this while Yasuyo's describing it.

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay, did you get that over there Yasuyo?

 

Yasuyo:

Oh okay. Yeah.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay, so David does not have this link so you have to describe it to him. This is the challenge for you.

 

David Peachy:

I know absolutely nothing, everyone else knows what's happening, not me. Okay.

 

Yasuyo:

Ah yes, I see. Now ... so this is a news website of and ... it's described the traditional performance in Japan ...

 

David Peachy:

Okay

 

Yasuyo:

And so there are several men wearing work wear and climb up to the ladders and they dance on the top of the ladders.

 

David Peachy:

Right, okay tell me more.

 

Yasuyo:

So this is the Japanese traditional performance which is hold, which is held by the traditional fireman, firework man.

 

David Peachy:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)

 

Yasuyo:

And so they are their volunteers in Edo period. It is from 17th centuries to 19 centuries and they're a kind of so carpenters and they works as a volunteer in big fire and they and they gathered and go to extinguish fire.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay Yasuyo I'm just going to stop you for a second. I want to ask David, David what's the image that you have in your head from what Yasuyo's described to you?

 

David Peachy:

This is interesting because I was thinking of modern workers and then I hear seventeen hundred workers so this has put a really image in my head. Is it something like Burning Man? No?

 

Keiran Watters:

Burning Man, well what's Burning Man? I'm not sure Yasuyo's aware of what Burning Man is?

 

David Peachy:

Okay, Burning Man is a new festival. They build a large wooden structure in the shape of a man and they burn it. Of course many other things happen. It's a music and arts and cultural festival, but the culmination, the ending is a big wooden human figure on fire, thus Burning Man.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay. Is that what it looks like, Yasuyo, to you? Is it a big wooden structure on fire?

 

Yasuyo:

No, no.

 

David Peachy:

There's a fire?

 

Yasuyo:

No, so nowadays it's not ... They perform without any fire.

 

David Peachy:

Oh okay.

 

Keiran Watters:

So Yasuyo, can you just re-describe the images in the article that you see at the top? We want to see if we can get Dave to understand the images that we're seeing.

 

Yasuyo:

Yes.

 

David Peachy:

So there's dancing on ladders, I got that much.

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah, pole dancing, Japanese style. Firefighters in 17th century dressed, balanced on sky high ladders in traditional show. This is a [crosstalk 00:05:30]

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay Yasuyo, you're reading ...

 

David Peachy:

I'm getting a better idea now. Okay, this sounds interesting.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay, let's send David the pictures so he can follow what we're both looking at now.

 

David Peachy:

Great, so let's look. Okay unfortunately I can't see the picture, I'll just try to scroll down.

 

Keiran Watters:

The Australian government's blocking it there David?

 

David Peachy:

Yeah, they're already onto it, they're all over it. Nope, can't get it ... oh hang on, wait I see it!

 

 

Okay, loading loading, thank you Australian government. Pole dancing Japanese style, let's see it. Ah okay, so it's like a ... bamboo ladders and people in dress from a couple of centuries ago and wow, okay. Is it synchronized or is it choreographed, is it organized?

 

Yasuyo:

So they perform with a kind of a chant and so the other firefighters sing a chant and they perform one.

 

Keiran Watters:

Do they sing while they're on the ladders too?

 

Yasuyo:

I think the performers on the ladder, they don't sing. They dance acrobatic forms, acrobatic forms so it is very difficult to keep styles.

 

Keiran Watters:

Yeah, I think they're doing enough from these pictures. I don't think anyone can sing while upside down like 20 feet in the air.

 

David Peachy:

You said these are volunteer firefighters, is that right?

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah, yeah.

 

David Peachy:

Wow, okay. Extra skills.

 

Keiran Watters:

Do the Aussie firefighters do this, David?

 

David Peachy:

I think they should, I think it should become a thing in Australia and what time of year is this again. What month?

 

Yasuyo:

Uh usually this performance, uh is held in January at the end of New Year's Holidays Days.

 

David Peachy:

Okay, I'm asking because some of them have bare feet and their clothing looks a bit light so they must be freezing, I'm sure.

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah. So we call Dezome-shiki and it's the ceremony to start the New Year so it's usually January 5th or 6th every year.

 

David Peachy:

Can I ask is there some reasoning to prevent fires in the future or is there any like magical ...

 

Keiran Watters:

What's the significance of the event?

 

David Peachy:

Yeah

 

Yasuyo:

So [inaudible 00:09:23] So this performers are now ... The firefighters only keep the tradition and this is a show to preserve older tradition and Edo period so they usually in Asian people doesn't people didn't have a lot of water to extinguish fire and they climb up the rooftop and break down broke down houses.[crosstalk 00:10:36] So why they climb on the ladders ... So they prove their ability to climb up high places and to extinguish fire.

 

David Peachy:

Right, so the idea is not actually to put out the fire with water, to douse the fire, but they would knock down the building from like the house?

 

Yasuyo:

Knock down, knock down [crosstalk 00:11:15]

 

 

It is kind of the way of firefighting. So the patient way.

 

Keiran Watters:

Okay, so I'm understanding that now that is display of climbing up these high ladders and balancing on these ladders is kind of like a symbol of active through skill that was needed in the past. Is that right Yasuyo?

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah, so they want to preserve the traditional performance

 

David Peachy:

I see, mm-hmm (affirmative)

 

Yasuyo:

For every New Year's Day they perform so [inaudible 00:12:02] firefighters nowadays.

 

Keiran Watters:

Well this makes me glad I'm not a firefighter in Japan.

 

David Peachy:

Yeah, I couldn't do that. I don't have the fitness.

 

Keiran Watters:

David, before we wrap this podcast up is there anything you want to ask Yasuyo about this tradition or anything that wasn't clear from your end? How do you think Yasuyo did describing this event?

 

David Peachy:

I think it was pretty good once I understood that the ladders were vertical and not actually leaning against anything, then it made sense. Um so, can I ask the spectators, who are the people watching this event, do they understand the tradition and the significance as well?

 

Yasuyo:

So I think most of Japanese know who they are and what they do so we respect them. Such kind of they act such acrobatic performance.

 

David Peachy:

So it's more than just a show, it's a connection to the past. Wow.

 

Yasuyo:

Yeah.

 

Keiran Watters:

All right, great we're going to move on and wrap this up because we're running out of time, but I just want to say to all the people listening out there we gave Yasuyo a special challenge because I know Yasuyo on a personal basis and she is working towards being a tour guide in Japan so this is relevant to her life, but if you guys are listening and you want to come on and do a challenge similar to this in the future, don't be shy. Don't worry that it's going to be hard because challenging yourself is always fun and you can all notice it and Yasuyo did quite well today. I just want to thank you Yasuyo for coming on and doing this.

 

Yasuyo:

Thank you, Keiran.

 

David Peachy:

Thank you.

 

Keiran Watters:

And of course thank you David for helping us out too.

 

David Peachy:

Pleasure as always.

 

Yasuyo's Son:

Foreign Language. Japanese

 

Keiran Watters:

And thank yo Yasuyo's son who's in the background.

 

Yasuyo's Son:

Foreign Language. Japanese

 

Keiran Watters:

And we're going to catch you guys on the next podcast of Uncensored English.

Jan 2, 2017

 On today's first podcast of the New Year Anna is on and we discuss New Years resolutions, memories and past experiences. There's a full transcript available. If you find it useful please give us a review on Itunes. 

 

 

Keiran:

All right, today is the first podcast of the new years and we got Anna back on the podcast. How's it going, Anna?

 

Anna:

Hello, hello. Very well, thank you. How are you?

 

Keiran:

I'm doing good. I'm doing good. And uh we were just talking before we started, but new years is a time where a lot of people, they decide to make changes in their lives and they make resolutions. What are your feelings on that? Is that a popular thing in Australia? Are you one of the people who do that also?

 

Anna:

It's very popular in Australia. I think it popular in most of the Western world at the moment. Um I have a lot of friends who will resolve to lose weight or they'll decide to stop smoking, to quit smoking or something along those lines. Uh personally, I'm not a big fan of resolutions. As I mentioned to you briefly beforehand that I'm kind of a believer in willpower and muscle that we use regularly. I think like any muscle, the more we use it, the easier it is. And uh I don't know New years in the end, it's a good time to start on things, but at the same time it is just a date and I don't really see any reason to suddenly discover willpower on one day of the year. I think if it's there, it's there and if it's not, it's not and you need to work on it as a personal kind of thing.

 

Keiran:

Right, it's kind of like the Valentines Day of personal change, right?

 

Anna:

Yeah, that's a really good way of putting it. Yeah.

 

Keiran:

That's the thing I always had against Valentines Day. Valentines Day is silly because you should just enjoy the person you're with all throughout the year. But on Valentines Day everything gets jacked up. All the prices, everyone goes to the restaurants. I always tell my wife, "Let's just celebrate Valentines Day next week when no one else is celebrating it."

 

Anna:

Also, Valentines day ... I feel like Valentines Day is more about making people feel bad about themselves and about being single than it is necessarily about a true celebration of love.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I don't know. I never felt bad about being single. I think there's certain people who do. I was watching comedy this weekend, and this one comedian who's like, "Oh, you know, I'm single and I'm lonely." I'm just like, "I am so jealous of your life. I would like to feel loneliness just once a year." It's a nice spice to throw in your life once in a while.

 

Anna:

Yeah, that's cool.

 

Keiran:

You appreciate [crosstalk 00:02:38]

 

Anna:

You know what they say, you don't know what you've got until it's gone.

 

Keiran:

Right.

 

Anna:

Maybe have a day or two where you've got nothing and then you go, "Oh, hang on, that's right I actually really love being with other people."

 

Keiran:

Right. Yeah I know.

Anna:

... Miss it.

 

Keiran:

My wife and daughter went to Mongolia about a year and a half ago for three months. After a month I was like, "I feel alone." You've got to not have something to appreciate it for a while, right?

 

Anna:

Absolutely.

 

Keiran:

All right, we're getting way off topic here.

 

Anna:

We do that. That's out thing.

 

Keiran:

That's okay. That's good. I like that. It's new years and I thought we could share a few new years stories. I think I'll go ahead and go first. For you guys listening over there, remember there's a transcript for this so if you want to follow along or you find we're talking too fast for you, well you can just go to the website and check it out.

 

 

And my story was when I was ... Oh my god, I think it's sixteen years ago. Holy shit. Time goes by fast.

 

Anna:

You're so old, Keiran.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I know. I still look young, though.

 

Anna:

How do you handle the age creeping up on you?

 

Keiran:

I don't know. I'm not one of those people who worries about it. It was new years ... I always mix these two up. Not new years day, new years eve day. Right?

 

Anna:

Okay, yeah the day of new years eve.

 

Keiran:

Right, exactly.

 

Anna:

Okay, with you.

 

Keiran:

My parents, oddly, they went out for a new years party. They don't usually do that. My sisters were all gone to new years parties, too. My girlfriend at the time came over. My mom didn't trust me very well at that time, which is probably smart because I was a sixteen year old boy. She made plans with my friend and his father that they would drive us to a party. We were really excited because my girlfriend and I were alone in the house. We were going to, you know, do what sixteen year old kids do.

 

Anna:

What's that, Keiran?

 

Keiran:

Well, we were going to, you know, go all the way. Actually, I might have been fifteen. I don't know if it was sixteen, but it was my first time. Like, we had planned this. It was really exciting for both of us, obviously. And I don't know what time my mother left, but pretty much as soon as we left we ran up to the bedroom and we were starting, and then not too long after that my friend's father called because he was driving us to the party and we didn't answer the phone. He just kept calling and then the voicemail goes on and he's like, "Hello, are you guys okay? Hello? Why aren't you answering the phone? Hello!" I was just like, oh, this is the worst first experience of anything.

 

Anna:

Was this mid-deed?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, no, exactly. We were in the middle of it and we just had to hear my friend's dad be like, "Hello, Keiran, where are you? Answer the phone!" It was just a weird way to start ... It was a weird thing to experience before we went to the party. That just happens sometimes on new years, I guess.

 

Anna:

Yeah, sure. I feel like this is more of a first time story than a new years story.

 

Keiran:

Well, it did happen on new years so it is a ...

 

Anna:

Okay, fair enough. Yeah.

 

Keiran:

It was a first time new years story, I guess.

 

Anna:

Keiran, you know you can admit to me if the only reason you're doing this podcast is so you could tell that story, right?

 

Keiran:

No, it's part of the reason. It's probably about 50%.

 

Anna:

It's okay. It's a good story.

 

Keiran:

It was a fun night.

 

Anna:

So I mean were you scarred? Did you find every time after that you were just waiting for the phone to ring?

 

Keiran:

No, I wasn't scarred. It was just annoying. You're excited for something and then ... It's like when you go see a movie you're excited about but there's someone eating popcorn right behind your head. You're just like, "Oh, come on. I'm trying to enjoy the movie."

 

Anna:

Yeah, I mean my first time was similar except it's like going to a movie you're really excited to see and then the screen is just dark because it's so boring.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's funny.

 

Anna:

That's also not ... That wasn't a new years eve story.

 

Keiran:

That's okay. That's what you should expect in your first time in most things because it's your first time and it'll probably be bad, right?

 

Anna:

Yeah, but I was ready for all the horror stories and the pain. I was just like, "Oh, this is super boring." Afterwards, he'd had a great time and he was like, "Wow! How amazing!" And I was like, "Yeah. Uh huh, sure."

 

Keiran:

For you.

 

Anna:

I didn't know what to say. I was like, this cannot be all there is to it.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's the weird thing is that I think it's so dependent on your partner and I guess having chemistry.

 

Anna:

Also, we're going way off topic again, but also knowing what you like, I think. That's the other thing. You only really find out with a bit of time.

 

Keiran:

Right, and also you experience that through having different partners and things. In the beginning, you just don't know anything.

 

Anna:

Yeah.

 

Keiran:

I was like, "This is so weird. What am I doing." You know what you're doing, but you never know what something is until you experience it. My first time was just a wreck because of what happened with the phone.

 

Anna:

I mean, you've got a daughter so you obviously worked it out eventually.

 

Keiran:

Well, that doesn't mean ... This is the funny thing about having kids is that they always say that when you get married you have less sex. I think it's not that you're married, I think it's that people have kids and when you have kids they're just like, "Oh my god, I have no freedom now. I'm not going to do that activity anymore because I don't want it to get worse."

 

Anna:

I don't really have experience in that area, so I'll leave that insight up to you.

 

Keiran:

Okay, so we're completely off topic here. That's okay.

 

Anna:

It's what we do.

 

Keiran:

What about you? Do you have any new years memories that you recall that were fun?

 

Anna:

I mean, I mean most of my crazy stories just involve me getting naked in different places around the world.

 

Keiran:

Nice.

 

Anna:

I don't really ...

 

Keiran:

This is a new years tradition for Anna.

 

Anna:

I'm trying to think of which one's going to insult the least number of people. I think probably it would be just a standard pool party new years eve that I had with one of my ex-boyfriend's group of friends, I should say. And yeah we had a pool party. That one was weird for other reasons. We all got naked and went swimming and that was fun, but then the weird thing was that one guy in the group, he started ... This was a long time ago, by the way, before things got really crazy. He started talking about how he was a science student and how, if he wanted to, he could make bombs and how he had all these ingredients. It was quite weird.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's weird, right.

 

Anna:

That was the reason that memory sticks out to me is actually because he was such a weirdo rather than necessarily because I was naked which, as I said, I have a tendency to do at parties.

 

Keiran:

That's funny. Everyone's having a good time and people are naked and he's like, "Yeah, and I can make bombs. Let's go back to my place and mix some chemicals."

 

Anna:

You know, it was his place. That was why it was so creepy. We were all like, "Are we about to get blown up or something?" We were all kind of on edge after that. That was weird.

 

Keiran:

Was he one of those people who was just doing it just to kind of scare you guys a little and have fun or was he really off?

 

Anna:

I don't know. He was a bit of a weirdo. He and I never really got along, to be honest, because one time he kind of got up in my face and I slapped him because he was too close and I thought I felt threatened so I gave him a slap. Then he was like, "I'm going to call the police because you slapped me." I was like, "Go ahead. Call the police and I'll tell them about the bombs you were bragging about. Which one do you think they're going to be more concerned about?"

 

Keiran:

Those slaps are pretty dangerous, right.

 

Anna:

You know, um that same party, actually, there was an old friend of mine was there as well. He was really into the puppetry of the penis. Do you know this?

 

Keiran:

Yeah, yeah. Right, right.

 

Anna:

Where you manipulate it into different shapes and then you say, oh wow, this is ...

 

Keiran:

He's in to doing it or he was into the ...

 

Anna:

He would do it. The thing was he did it all the time. This was a thing. Whenever he had about two or three beers in him, it would be out.

 

Keiran:

It's a hot dog, look at it.

 

Anna:

No, his was the hamburger. He was very proud of the hamburger.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, I can imagine how you would do that, right.

 

Anna:

Yeah. Unfortunately I don't need to imagine it.

 

Keiran:

You've got the vivid visual imagery. You have like a photo back on one of your computers or something.

 

Anna:

Oh, it's right up here. It's in the memory banks. There you go.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, that's one of those funny things that happens when you're young and you're drunk, people get naked and do funny things. I remember one thing that people used to do which is funny was the guys would tuck all their junk between their legs, you know.

 

Anna:

Oh yes!

 

Keiran:

So it looks like they're a lady.

 

Anna:

Yeah. I'm convinced that the guys who do that and say they look like a lady have not seen a lady's parts.

 

Keiran:

I think they're just enthused to look like they're androgynous and or a eunuch or something.

 

Anna:

We're not like Barbie dolls, you know.

 

Keiran:

No, I know. Even Barbie dolls don't really look like ladies.

 

Anna:

Well yeah there's that. The Ken doll doesn't really look like a dude.

 

Keiran:

No, it doesn't. That's true. Okay, well this has been a really loose podcast about new years and more, I guess, about sex and being naked and doing silly things.

 

Anna:

Yeah, I think you're going to need to slap a nice big warning on this one.

 

Keiran:

That's fun. I think that's what people like. There's enough of the safe stuff out there.

 

Anna:

That's true enough.

 

Keiran:

Anna, thanks so much for having us back on the podcast. Having us back? This is my podcast.

 

Anna:

I'm back. You're Keiran, you're having me back on the podcast.

 

Keiran:

Yeah, thanks for coming back on the podcast again. Have a happy new year.

 

Anna:

Yeah, have a happy new year.

 

Keiran:

All right, bye bye.

 

Anna:

Bye.

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